Course Information

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Research Methodology: CDMM Research Seminar (DA030102dm)

Credits:3

This is the main research seminar for the Skoltech Center for Design, Manufacturing and Materials (CDMM). All MSc students either enrolled into the Master Program in Advanced Manufacturing Technologies or PhD students affiliated with CDMM should attend this seminar. The format of the seminar is weekly invited lectures from top scientists in the research fields related to Advanced Manufacturing, Digital Engineering Technologies, and Mechanics and Physics of Advanced Manufacturing will be given.

Innovation and Intellectual Property Studies Doctoral Seminar (DC060009)

Credits:6

Startup Founders Workshop (DC060023)

Credits:6

Thesis Final Review: Mathematics and Mechanics (DD060037mm)

Credits:6

Preparation for Pedagogy (DE000006)

Credits:0

Preparation for Pedagogy [DE000006] is a pre-requisite for Pedagogy of Higher Education course [DG030025] only for the first year PhD students. Please enroll in this shell-course when you already have an arrangement with a course instructor to be a technical Teaching Assistant. This does not mean that you will be leading lectures or seminars. Instead, you might help with grading, populating the course page in Canvas, material and paper preparation for classes and assist with other technical tasks.

Academic Communication: Preparatory English for Phd Exam (DE030029)

Credits:3

Efficient professional communication is the key to Academic success. The course is designed for PhD students who want to maximize their academic potential by boosting their ability to write research papers, present in front of multidisciplinary audiences, participate in scholarly discussions and engage in other forms of academic communication. The main goal of the course is to enable PhD students to produce clear, correct, concise and coherent texts acceptable for the international professional community. The course is designed for a multi-disciplinary audience. The course serves as a preparation for the qualification language exam, which is a prerequisite for the Thesis defense.

Teachers Toolkit for Higher Education (DE030039)

Credits:3

Academic Communication: Preparatory English for Phd Exam (DF030029)

Credits:3

English. Candidate Examinations (DG030003)

Credits:3

This is a meta-course which allows PhD students to register for English Qualification Exam for the Russian PhD Degree. There will be no lectures or seminars, only the exam. The preparatory course is also available in course catalog (look for "Academic Communication for PhD students" course). The Exam has two parts: Part 1 - Pre-exam activities (Assignments 1, 2a, 2b) Part 2 - Activities on Examination day (Assignment 3): a ten-minute presentation based on the student's research, followed by a discussion.

Pedagogical Experience (DG030005)

Credits:3

The main function of this course is to articulate Skoltech's expectations on PhD students who do their pedagogical TA assignment at Skoltech. The course describes the intended learning outcomes and how they are assessed. The main bulk of the 81 hours of the course is spent in the actual courses in which the PhD-students do their TA-assignments. The assignments in the course itself include TA proposal and TA report and require less than 6 hours of work. Your course instructor and Educational department should approve both assignments in Canvas in terms of content and formal requirements respectively. 

Qualifying Exam (DG030020)

Credits:3

Pedagogy of Higher Education (DG030025)

Credits:3

The course offers an introduction to facilitating learning in higher education for PhD students who are asked to act as teaching assistants or supervisors. The course content focuses on aligning learning outcomes with learning activities and assessment strategies. Constructive alignment in the course is defined at high resolution such that learning outcomes for a course are elaborated into separate activities and assignments for students. In other words, learning outcomes need to be articulated at every level of learning activities from course to assignment. The course also rests on the approach that learning is promoted by feedback. The assessment design that participants in the course design will therefore be required to reflect significant and effective use of continuous formative assessment. Such formative assessment requires strategic learning activities and assignments, and the course therefore comes with an emphasis on communication-to-learn activities including peer learning. Skoltech is an English medium instruction environment, and the course contains discussion topics to highlight ways of addressing the potential effects of language and culture barriers for high quality student learning. All topics in the course are applied by participants on their own teaching and learning experiences and are meant to be used as they prepare and plan for their teaching assistantships or their supervisory activities to come. All participants will have a task to produce a reflection on their future actions to evolve as facilitators and meet the requirements of the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Teachers Toolkit for Higher Education (DG030039)

Credits:3

History and Philosophy of Science. Candidate Examinations (DG060026)

Credits:6

History and Philosophy of Science The aim of this course is to give to Skoltech students and postgraduates basic information about the main stages of the development of science from its birth in Ancient Greece through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance to Modern Times and to the great scientific revolutions of the XX century. Every man of culture especially a future scientist should know the impact of such great thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Avicenna, Nicholas of Cusa, Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Boscovich, Darwin, Bohr and Einstein (omitting many other brilliant names, that would be spoken about in the frames of the course) to the development of a scientific picture of the universe. Also there will be discussed the main topics and notions of the philosophy of science: demarcation between science and humanities, Popper’s theory of falsification, Kuhn’s theory of scientific revolutions, science-philosophical ideas of Lakatos and Feyerabend. The course will consist of 18 3-hour lectures and 6 examination sessions (3 hour each). The students are to submit 6 written essays in English on the following themes: 1. Ancient Greek and Roman Science; 2. Medieval and Renaissance Science; 3. Scientific Revolution of the XVII century; 4. Science in the XVIII and XIX century; 5. Science in the XX-XXI centuries; 6. Philosophy of Science. For the final exam the students should prepare 10-15 minutes oral presentation on the scientific problem they are currently working upon (on the theme of their research). Lectures 1-3 are devoted to the Ancient Greek and Roman Science Lectures 4-6 are devoted to Medieval and Renaissance Science Lectures 7-9 are devoted to the Scientific Revolution of the XVII century Lectures 10-12 are devoted to Science in the XVIII and XIX century Lectures 13-15 are devoted to Science in the XX-XXI centuries Lectures 16-18 are devoted to the Philosophy of Science

Philosophy of Science, Technology and Innovation (DG060026k)

Credits:6

This course will introduce students to the art of thinking critically and philosophically about the fundamental nature of technology, the fundamental nature of science, and the practical interplay of science and technology in the process of innovation. It will focus attention on understanding the differences between technology and science, and the direction of causality between them. Is technology really “applied science” (as is often presumed) or does science depend for its progress upon the prior development of technology? Historically, which tends to come first? The course will draw heavily upon a selection of critical literature in the modern scholarly field of the philosophy of technology, exposing students to the ideas of key thinkers who are shaping the field. The following questions will also be addressed: What is the relationship between technology and human society? Does technological change evolve autonomously along an inevitable trajectory of progress, or is it socially or politically determined? Does technology embody the culture and norms of the society in which it develops? Can technology be intrinsically “good” or intrinsically “bad,” or is technology morally neutral? Should engineers and scientists be held accountable in any way for the impact of their inventions on society and nature? Can the direction of technological change be consciously controlled by humans? What does it mean to “manage” technology? Who is responsible for dealing with the impact of new technology on society? Students will participate in a series of lectures and seminars, and study a set of scholarly readings, covering themes related to the above questions. Each student will write a paper investigating and analyzing a philosophical issue related to his or her own field of scientific or engineering research or interest.

Storytelling to Master Speech & Presentation Skills, 20 hours (I-01-19)

Credits:0.74

? What is a story? ? How to think like an audience ? Be able to build stories around their projects that audience can relate to easily and understand. ? Increase their confidence when speaking to audience. ? Be able to draft engaging speeches and presentations for various needs (Events, competitions, workplace, …) ? Learn the right techniques for voice tone, body movement and facial expressions. ? How to create slides that motivate the audience favorably to understand their ideas (Product, Project …) ? The right communication language & techniques to use when responding to audience questions. ? What content to include on the pitch deck (PowerPoint Slides) ? Deal with stress and anxiety prior and during various presentations types.

Privacy and Data Protection (for Non-Lawyers), 11 hours (I-02-19)

Credits:0.41

The main goal is to give students an idea how privacy and personal data protection regulations work in the modern age. Activity will cover (on very high level) 4 main topics: (1) privacy; (2) personal data protection; (3) big user data; (4) private sphere as limit of law. These four concepts describe the interaction between data subjects (individuals) and data processors (entities using the data about individuals for their needs) as a legal matter. During the activity the role of law as a social regulator will be discussed, along with possible legal instruments and factors (technologies, business and social models) increasing and decreasing their efficiency. As the activity is for non-lawyers, it will offer views on the legal matter both from inside (positivistic view, threating privacy and data protection laws as 'Ding an sich') and from outside (economic analysis of privacy; privacy risk management; privacy by design)

Waves, 12 hours (I-03-19)

Credits:0.44

Semi-popular course devoted to light, sound and water waves. After attending the course, you shall be able to answer simple questions like: Why we often see periodic water waves and rarely hear a pure note? Why waves come parallel to the shore no matter the wind direction? Why it is difficult to hear shouting against the wind? What feels a pilot passing the sound barrier? How road police catches speeders? More technically, you will know the basics like linear notions of phase and group velocity, caustics and nonlinear effects of shock creation, harmonics generation, wave instabilities and solitons.

Introduction to Information and Cyber Security Policy and Operations, 20 hours (I-04-19)

Credits:0.74

Cyber attacks are an increasingly common occurrence, making cybersecurity a growing challenge for all. The many forms of cyber-threats - spanning from data theft to surveillance and system compromise - have become tools of activism, corporate espionage and intelligence gathering. This seminar-style ISP course provides an introduction to the general challenges of cybersecurity and provides students with the skills to defend their organisation, scientific developments and personal computers from the most common forms of attack. At the conclusion of the course, students will: (1) Demonstrate a practical understanding of the organisational, policy and security contexts in which cybersecurity is important; (2) Understand the historical, strategic and normative context that cybersecurity draws upon; (3) Describe cyber security attack methodologies and relevant approaches to protective cyber security; (4) Outline effective cyber environments for protecting one's scientific developments or organisation; and (5) Evaluate cyber readiness of organisational and personal computing facilities

Internal Information Security for Future Managers, 34 hours (I-05-19)

Credits:1.26

In a Digital Economy, all business processes are nothing more than transactions within applications. The users of these applications, especially the managers, are expected to know the basic and advanced rules of secure use of information systems. This course will demonstrate the theory and practice of secure use of information systems with all types of user activities, while avoiding the main internal information security risks. These include: user errors, insider activity, internal fraud, developer backdoors, and others. The course will show the modern methods of enforcing secure employee behaviour, as well as the ways to build the necessary behaviour patterns, both in theory and case studies. After this course, the students are expected to understand the main types of confidential information, the main information security risks within a company, and the methods for combatting them, both technical and psychological.

From Idea to Startup, 40 hours (I-06-19)

Credits:1.48

The "From Idea to Start-Up" course goal is to promote an entrepreneurial mindset for engineering students and give them tools to identify opportunities, understand market forces, and successfully commercialize new technologies. These important skills can better prepare them to enter the workforce and thrive in this ever-changing global economy. These skills are just as relevant for success in established enterprises as they are in startups. This course goes beyond the theory of developing a business by providing a real-world application. In addition, understanding the innovation ecosystem is essential at the present time where the discourse of innovation is widespread and innovation is high on the agenda within any organization, be it private or public, local or global. Among other things, the course aims to provide practical tools to enhance innovation that students will be able to implement in their work environment. The goal of the course is to develop, through close academic guidance, the skills and tools needed to establish a new hi-tech venture. No matter the participants background, all students gain valuable insight into what it takes to turn an idea into a real, scalable business through marketing, public speaking, flexibility, teamwork, current business trends, and more. The students will strengthen important skills such as identifying, defining, and characterizing problems, conducting market research, formulating strategies, etc. The course will include lectures and individual guidance sessions. Students will be required to submit papers relating to technological ideas that they will come up with.

Science in Contemporary Art, 35 hours (I-07-19)

Credits:1.48

Students will expand their knowledge of Contemporary Art linked to science and engineering, as well as work on projects in groups and individually to foster their own creativity. Students will practice critical thinking, presentation skills, and team-building skills. Students will study global collaborations between specialists of the arts and sciences, and the engineering community to provide the exchange of ideas to stimulate innovative ideas in the science community and the creation of scientific and artistic projects. By the end of the course, students will have a basic knowledge of the main themes in contemporary art and will be able to examine their scientific work from artistic and cultural perspectives.

Modernism in Literature of the 20th Century, 20 hours (I-08-19)

Credits:0.74

Modernism is both a group of different literary movements that existed between the 1880s -1950s and oeuvre of individual novelists, poets and drama writers. The ISP Activity «Modernism in Literature of the 20th century» is a course of lectures and seminars focused on history, aesthetics, and poetics of modernism and works of main modernist writers Franz Kafka, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, and T.S. Eliot. The purpose of the ISP activity is to encourage students to move beyond their main professional fields, develop their analytic skills and give them an opportunity for cultural and professional growth. Modernism is related to ???????the culture and science of the 20th. Ideas and theories by Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Niels Bohr changed the worldview of modernist writers and transformed the ???????aesthetic of their works. Participation in ISP Activity «Modernism in Literature of the 20th century» gives students the opportunity for cultural and professional growth. They can see the complexity and interrelation of all elements of culture and science and understand the subject of their research from a new point of view. For participants of ISP Activity «Modernism in Literature of the 20th century» will provide an opportunity to get to know the methodology of academic literary studies. The lecture course can help to develop the ability to navigate in scientific literature devoted to contemporary culture. Complexity and polysemy of modernist literature can help to shape the skills of critical thinking. Students can see and understand intercultural relations in the field of literature, art, and science.

Existentialism and Literature of the 20th Century: Sartre, Camus, Golding, Fowles, Salinger, 20hours (I-09-19)

Credits:0.74

Existentialism is the most important phenomenon of philosophy and literature of the 20th century. The ISP Activity "Existentialism and Literature of the 20th century: Sartre, Camus, Golding, Fowles, Salinger" is a course of lectures and seminars focused on works of main existentialist philosophers and writers: Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, William Golding, John Fowles, and Jerome David Salinger. The purpose of the ISP activity is to encourage students to move beyond their main professional fields, develop their analytic skills and give them an opportunity for cultural and professional growth. Existentialism is related to the history, culture, and literature of the 20th century. Participation in ISP Activity "Existentialism and Literature of the 20th century” gives students the opportunity for cultural and professional growth. They can see the complexity and interrelation of all elements of history, culture philosophy, and literature and understand the subject of their research from a new point of view. For participants of ISP Activity “Existentialism and Literature of the 20th century: Sartre, Camus, Golding, Fowles, Salinger” will provide an opportunity to get to know the methodology of academic literary studies. The lecture course can help to develop the ability to navigate in scientific literature devoted to contemporary culture.

Science Communication Crash Course, 14 hours (I-10-19)

Credits:0.52

Tijana is the main instructor, I am co-instructor The Information and digital age have erased boundaries in science and increased the rate by which science is performed and is published. The nature of research has also changed – it is more interdisciplinary, more technologically and society oriented but also more competitive and fast. Communicating ideas and research well has become the essence of successful science marketing. Moreover science communication has become a survival tool for every scientist whether trying to attract funding or promote his/her work. Crash course in science communication is a a combination of lectures and practical work. Students will learn how to: Make a good presentation for the right occasion (public lecture, science lecture or pitch) Communicate science to general public in short lectures Communicate science in media (TV, radio, newspapers) Communicate science through online media. Use other formats of science communication (art, tours, memes etc.) Dr. Tijana Prodanovic is Full Professor at Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad. She holds Doctor of Philosophy degree in astrophysics from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. 1. The winner of national FameLab contest in 2008 for the best young science communicator, and first runner up at the International FameLab contest 2008 held at Cheltenham Science Festival in Great Britain. 2. Speaker at the TEDxYouth@ISB event held in Belgrade in 2011. and TEDx Karlovacka Gimnazija held in 2016. 3. Author of a paper titled “Ten Commandments for Presentations“, published at Communicating Astronomy with the Public Journal (2009), 9, 19. ... Completed a number of international masterclass trainings in presentation and science communication skills and organized even more of them for researchers and University lecturers all over Europe Tijana's CV is available here: http://people.df.uns.ac.rs/~prodanvc/Tijana%20Prodanovic_CV_eng_v2.pdf

Introduction to General Management & Strategy, 12 hours (I-11-19)

Credits:0.44

This course focuses on how General Managers and CEOs design and implement strategies to sustain and enhance business performance, examining issues central to the long- and short-term competitive position of the firms they lead. As a field, Strategic Management attempts to explain why and how some firms outperform others in the market place, developing competitive advantage and sustaining it over time. Strategy involves making choices to use your resources in order to achieve your goal. This implies in most instances commitments that are difficult to revert. As such, it is crucial for organizations and their executives to develop a strategic mindset that help them to understand their strategic options and the consequences of their decisions for the future of the organization. The course provides a set of frameworks and analytical tools that enable you to understand and plan effective strategies for companies competing in a range of industries.

Negotiation Games, 28 hours (I-12-19)

Credits:1.04

Students will learn the broad range of people management, influence, and negotiation skills taught in the form of interactive class games. We will play canonical games, including, but not limited by: 1) Keynesian beauty contest, 2) positional bargaining, 3) ultimatum game, 4) oil game, 5) beer game, 6) group win-win (both inquisitive and casted), 7) blind win-win, 8) assymetric group bargaining. This course replicates and expands the world-famous Wharton Negotiation Boothcamp. Excitement is guaranteed, learning is hard to avoid. Please note that this course is light on homework, but hard on attendance. Your participation in the class activities is your core learning and it is also the core tool of your classmates learning. Even 1 hour of class absence is betrayal of both yourself and your classmates and will lead to fail grade. Please expect be in class 10am to 7pm for three days with reasonable breaks.

EQ Hardcore, 28 hours (I-13-19)

Credits:1.04

Students will learn the broad range of Emotional Intelligence (EQ) skills taught in the form of interactive class games staged in an intensive mode producing hardcore experience. We will start from social and personal awareness, exercise in stress management, and culminate in influence. The fine line between influence, motivation, manipulation, and exploitation will be crossed several times under several angles and in different directions. We will play and do canonical group games and exercises, including, but not limited by: 1) Keynesian beauty contest, 2) passive browsing, 3) preaching to statue, 4) goals and values prioritization, 5) glasswalking (WARNING! It is real barefoot walking on real broken glass), 6) influence row and zhmurki (WARNING! It is more painful then glasswalking). This course replicates and expands the world-famous Stanford GSB “Interpersonal Dynamics” (aka “Touchy Feely”) class, one of the most famous and successful educational soft skills endeavors on the global scale. Excitement is guaranteed, learning is hard to avoid. Please note that this course is light on homework, but hard on attendance. Your participation in the class activities is your core learning and it is also the core tool of your classmates learning. Even 1 hour of class absence is betrayal of both yourself and your classmates and will lead to fail grade. Please expect be in class 10am to 7pm for three days with reasonable breaks. PLEASE NOTE THAT this ISP class strongly overlaps with the E&I course "Leadership for Innovators" hence you should not attend this ISP class if you wish to attend the E&I class.

Four Sprints to AI-Based Product, 30 hours (I-14-19)

Credits:1.11

“4 Sprints to AI-based Product” is an introduction to modern AI technologies with the special focus onto the opportunities and challenges for the practical application of these technologies in real industry and business world. Through team and project-based work students will learn hot topics related to (1) state-of-the-art technologies and approaches in the area of 2D-3D images ML; (2) what is the right way to build and evaluate ML model intended for practical industrial use case and business case; (3) team and project-based work with modern SW Engineering technical and project management practices. During the course you will get in-depth understanding of how to build frameworks such as listed in collections https://github.com/analysiscenter and https://github.com/gazprom-neft . Your final demo is to come with a tool of your own. In addition, the course will bridge students to potential host organizations for 2020 summer industry immersion (e.g. AI department of Gazpromneft which is the course partner).

Practical Aspects of Parametric Optimization, 15 hours (I-15-19)

Credits:0.56

Parametric optimization has a wide range of applications in almost any domain and at any stage of the design and production. During this course we will discuss typical scenarios, suitable methods and approaches and their strength and limitations, illustrated both with real industrial use cases and simple models. Theoretical part will include the basics of parametric optimization, introduction to mathematical methods, overview of most popular algorithms for single and multi-objective optimization and their applicability to different types of problems. Main attention will be paid to the typical issues we face solving real tasks, such as high dimensionality, noise in the responses, severely constrained and il-posed problems and multi-modal response behavior. Practical part will have a form of the hands-on sessions, where you will be able to play with toy examples illustrating the issues listed above and test different methods and tricks to resolve them. Course will include 4 theoretical lectures and 4 practical sessions.

Innovation Project: Tech for Good, 40 hours (I-16-19)

Credits:1.48

The course is planned as combination of theoretical and hands-on activities. It is practice-oriented course with much of the time spent on shaping technology-based opportunities driven by social responsibility idea. A central objective of this crash course is to help students develop the ability to find, evaluate, and develop technological ideas into commercially viable and socially responsible product concepts, and communicate those concepts into viable business propositions. Students will propose ideas, technology and user driven, check their hypothesis with users and work on developing the most promising into parts of a location based mobile application that encourages people to do good for their local community. Learning outcomes: • Understanding the concept of social responsibility and Sustainability Development Goals (Agenda 2030 of the United Nations) • Understand the importance of social responsibility and its impact on business development, especially how it shapes innovative ideas. • Understand how to translate user needs and wants into considerations of design, use and application. • Ability to use engineering, scientific and creative problem solving tools and methods, to assess and design an opportunity in the form of product / service. • Ability to forge technology-based ideas into workable business concepts and learn how to test them in the marketplace. • Ability to shape and present ideas in the different oral and written forms, depending on occasion and audience • Ability to work in groups.

Extracting Value from Data: McKinsey Challenge, 20 hours (I-17-19)

Credits:0.74

Companies have historically managed assets such as property, plants, equipment, inventory, cash, and intellectual property. In today’s digital world, a new type of asset is emerging – data. Companies are reporting, collecting, and analyzing vast volumes of data. Data is becoming a key measure of whether a company will remain relevant through the digital revolution. And, the key challenge is being able to extract value from data. Thus, understanding and practicing how to extract value from data is one of the most important new knowledge domains. In this ISP course, I partner with McKinsey Russia to teach students exactly this. The course will be delivered as a hackathon (business case + some coding) supported (lecture, mentoring, assessment) by experts from McKinsey Russia. Learning outcomes: • Understanding the concept of digital transformation • Understand the value of data for businesses • Ability to use engineering, scientific and creative problem solving tools and methods, to extract value from data. • Ability to shape and present ideas in the different oral and written forms, depending on occasion and audience • Ability to work in groups.

Express Academic Writing, 30 hours (I-18-19)

Credits:1.11

The ability to communicate ideas and report research findings in writing is one of the key factors of academic success. Academic writing in English is challenging for the non-native speakers who are expected to produce papers, reports, and dissertations acceptable for the international professional community. Contrary to popular belief, it is impossible to become a professional writer overnight. Moreover, there is no such thing as a “perfect first draft”. Writing is a skill, and its mastery requires a considerable investment of time and effort. The Course is designed to develop a conscious approach to academic writing through the analysis of authentic texts, intensive writing and editing practice. The ‘process-for-product’ approach takes the students through the whole writing cycle as they are learning to write a draft and use the reviewer's advice to edit, refine and polish it. The Course focuses on the specifics of the main parts of the research paper in terms of structure, vocabulary, grammar, and style. I can’t promise you a miracle; I can promise hard work and rewarding experience. And in the end, you will be much better equipped to write a research paper.

The Roots of Scientific English, 30 hours (I-19-19)

Credits:1.11

Course Components: - Derivation and basic meaning of English words from Latin and Greek elements - Morphology of vocabulary in the natural, earth, medical and physical sciences - Survey of scientific nomenclature, origins - Application by pointwise comprehension in scholarly literature Learning Outcomes: - Acquire a working vocabulary of the fundamental Greek and Latin roots, prefixes, and suffixes - Understand the historical processes leading to the development of current scientific terminology - Learn selected topics among word parsing, term clustering, malformations and linguistic implications of the Scientific Revolution - Understand the mechanisms of word formation and their impact on modern scientific and social English - Apply knowledge to scientific communication, viz., reading, creativity, presenting

Introduction to Cybersecurity, 25 hours (I-20-19)

Credits:0.93

In the modern world, where information systems play one of the most significant roles, security becomes one of the biggest challenges that affects everyone and everything: from ordinary users of social networks to the largest companies and even governments. Therefore, understanding of main principles and challenges of modern cybersecurity becoming important competence of every technical specialist and necessary knowledge for every person who cares about his personal data. During this course, students will learn: -The key concepts, definitions and challenges of today’s cybersecurity -The concepts of most popular vulnerabilities in different protocols, -services and systems and how they can be exploited -Basics of Cryptography -Basics of Reverse Engineering -Common personal security tools

Create Your Own Biomachine: Preparing for Genetically Engineered Machines Contest (iGEM), 22 hours (I-22-19)

Credits:0.81

This course is aimed to establish the team which will represent Skoltech at iGEM competition in 2020. The International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition (iGEM) is one of the most honorable competitions in biology. Working over the summer, student teams from all over the world design their own biological systems using tools for genetical engineering. Preparation for the context usually begins in winter from discussing the ideas that could be performed and presented at the iGEM conference in October in Boston. During the ISP course, students will discuss projects from the previous iGEM competition from the perspective of the Skoltech fundamentals: Scientific basis of the project, its Technological abilities, and Entrepreneurial perspectives. There will be introductory lectures for non-bio people, so students with different backgrounds are highly welcomed. These lectures will cover essential topics: molecular biology, genetical engineering, and current trends in genome editing. During project discussions and networking activities, students will communicate and understand everybody’s strong and weak areas of expertise. By the end of the course, students will come up with their own ideas that could be presented on iGEM 2020. Moreover, this course is an excellent opportunity to find new friends! By the end of the course we aim to: - establish the team which will represent Skoltech at iGEM competition next year - come up with several cool ideas of projects that can be done for the contest

Foundation in Digital 3D Sculpting | ART & DESIGN, 21 hours (I-23-19)

Credits:0.78

The Foundation in 3d digital Art & Design provides students the opportunity to value their interest and proficiency in the visual arts, while developing the fundamental skills that are essential building blocks to becoming a better artist and becoming better at expressing yourself. The result of the course will be a completed models for your portfolio. The last project will be printed on a 3d printer. Best gift for relatives and friends. Students will learn: 1. Program Interface and Navigation Tools 2. Sculpting tools and their settings 3. Modeling with ZSphere 4. Sculpting characters and environmental objects 5. Create and apply textures 6. Retopology grid, removing normal maps

Africanomics 101, 20 hours (I-24-19)

Credits:0.74

This course will expose students to the broader scopes of African history, economics, culture and geopolitics. Students will learn how to perform Economic Target Assessment using tools such as Gynawali and Fogel’s key dimensions for nations toward entrepreneurship development. This course will expose students, who are potential SK Innovators (Future Venture Capitalists) to the Entrepreneurial Portends of the African Continent. Students will enjoy the richness and beauty of Africa through interaction with well informed and passionate African Instructors, a possible trip to an African Museum in Moscow, Souvenirs)

Charisma: From Basics to Public Speaking, 24 hours (I-25-19)

Credits:0.89

Show students the key approaches for developing social skills: - Focus on outside work (body language, voice, fillers) - Focus on inside work (changing habits, developing mindsets, overcoming fears) Students will be able to apply these frameworks for independent development. Story-telling - basics of story-telling - tips for making the story brighter - how to imply story-telling to self-presentation, to project presentation, to public speaking and etc. Public speaking: - How to deal with stress during a public speaking - How to keep the attention of the audience Students will be able to prepare a talk and manage stress during delivering it.

Softplay - Soft Skills for Engineers, 24 hours (I-26-19)

Credits:0.89

The purpose of the course is to improve the soft skills of students with engineering backgrounds based on the practical experience of real project implementation and show them direct implementation of those skills in the field. We help them to analyze possible difficulties of implementing their work and prepare for them. By means of the business game, we place students in a controlled environment in which they can not only practice their skills but also analyze and improve them. The expected outcomes are for students to practice in negotiating, to understand that different people may act unpredictably and irrationally and develop strategies to act in this situation. Also, it aims to develop their soft skills and look at themselves from different perspectives. The additional goal is to make students think what is the viewpoint of the person without an engineering background (customer or end-user) on the technology they are developing. The important topic to consider is fairness. Despite people understand this work naturally, it is crucial to know that various people consider different things fair and unfair.

Design and Implementation of Human Activity Recognition in Robotics, 15 hours (I-27-19)

Credits:0.56

The course covers the basic concepts of HAR, including: data modalities (RGB/RGBD images, skeleton key points and other types) different approaches to the problem (classical CV, …, DL) notes on real-world applications (collision avoidance, action prediction) Also there will be given notes on the design of a handmade framework for Image Processing in robotics, currently being under active development. The key features of the framework are flexibility, simplicity and unification wherever possible.

Introduction to Reinforcement Learning, 22 hours (I-28-19)

Credits:0.81

Successful students will: - Be able to apply methods of Reinforcement Learning to their practical tasks, which require the application of decision-making techniques - Know how to choose an appropriate type of Reinforcement Learning algorithm, which is efficient for a concrete problem of interest (value-based vs policy-based, on-policy vs off- policy, sufficient exploration strategy) - Be able to continue their study of Reinforcement Learning on an advanced level - Be able to read, analyze and reproduce results of modern articles dedicated to the eld of Reinforcement Learning

Modular Synthesis with VCV Rack, 21 hours (I-29-19)

Credits:0.78

Modular synthesis is a paradigm for making music through the interaction and composition of multiple specialized modules, each performing a specific function. Modular synthesizers take a constructive approach to writing music, with every aspect of the resulting sound being designed from the ground up. They are ubiquitous in the world of electronic music, and offer a completely different workflow to most Digital Audio Workstations. By completing this course, a student will: * Learn the elements of modular synthesis * Gain practical skills enabling them to produce their own music in VCV rack * Deepen their appreciation for and understanding of the subtleties of synthesized music

Deep Dive in a World of Electronics: How to Design and Assemble Electronic Circuits, 26 hours (I-30-19)

Credits:0.96

The students will learn about electronic components and their physical behavior, they will learn how to put them together and solve simple circuits by hands and complex one with the help of common software. We'll go through the selection of the components from well known sellers and at the end the students will design and assemble independently a custom circuit on their own. While in Skoltech there is no electronics course, this short introduction aims to give the students a wide view on how to design electronic system and this will become very useful when they will need this skills for some project of other courses.

Solar Observations with a Telescope, 15 hours (I-31-19)

Credits:0.56

The purpose of the ISP course is to give a brief understanding of how astrophotography works, how should we work with a telescope and what we can observe with it in conditions of living in Moscow. The other part is headed to give students an introduction to Solar Physics, which events we can observe on the Sun, what information we can receive from this data and why it is important to know. We expect to provide lectures and 1-2 practical classes of observing the Sun, plus the session of data processing.

Mysterious Russian Soul: Russian Language, History, Culture, 30 hours (I-32-19)

Credits:1.11

The main goal is to learn the Russian language (for international students) and to help make a cultural exchange (for Russian students). At the end of this course, students will know the main points of the Russian history, the magnificent shapes of the Russian culture and key phrases for communication in Russia. There will be the lecture time in Moscow (three times per week) for a better understanding of Russian culture and history through architecture, the content of museums, ballet, and traditional dances. As a result, it is expected, that these students in the future will recommend to other potential students how great it is to study in our country and there is no need to be afraid of bears!

Working with Sequential Data, 27 hours (I-33-19)

Credits:1

Students will acquire a solid foundation in sequential data, primarily time series. The expected outcome is that they are able to solve problems involving time-series data in the areas of analysis, regression, classification, and clustering. Given that the course will focus on applications, students from all backgrounds can learn something useful for their day-to-day work. Time series are pervasive in all disciplines from signal processing to finance. Therefore, it is imperative as data scientists to have a solid understanding of this field.

Power of Storytelling, 12 hours (I-34-19)

Credits:0.44

Storytelling is an essential skill that is used to motivate other people and call for action. Through stories, we are able to tap into people’s values (rather than just issues) and evoke emotions that move people from inaction to action - while opening the space for hope, anger, urgency, solidarity, and sense that we can make a difference. Each of us has stories that can move others. Through this mini-course, you will be able to combine narratives that come from your own experiences, the lives of the people you meet, from your audience’s experiences and from what is currently facing us, and structure these into a compelling story. === By the end of the course, the learners are expected to: - analyze key components of a story - experiment with different storytelling plots - create, develop and tell stories that evoke actions

Industry Career Building - How to Get a Job of Your Dream, 12 hours (I-35-19)

Credits:0.44

Clear picture on how to move towards industrial career Better understanding of Russian R&D sector (and foreign R&D with Russian location) Job interview skills CV preparing skills (including for industrial immersion) Vision of Skoltech instruments to increase chances to get a great job (and how to benefit more from industrial immersion) It helps to start thinking and planning a career in industry in advance Moves closer to solving the problem of finding a for job in Russia There is usually a lack of time to prepare a good CV

Research Project, 40 hours (I-36-19)

Credits:1.48

Presentation Skills and Academic Communication, 21 hours (I-37-19)

Credits:0.78

Would you like to tell the Academic Community about your Research clearly, elegantly and professionally? Speaking in front of the international multi-disciplinary professional audience can be a challenge even for the experienced speakers. In this Course, the students will build and improve their skills, broaden their knowledge and get confidence to make effective presentations in English. The participants will practice a whole range of presentation techniques and formats, get feedback and set targets for their future presentations. Join this Course and practice making presentations with visual aids (slides, poster, and whiteboard). You will learn about the specifics of academic presentations in terms of form and content, and polish your language skills with the focus on intelligibility, pronunciation, and rhetoric.

Introduction to Social Studies of Science and Technology, 12 hours (I-38-19)

Credits:0.44

This class will discuss contemporary problems of the philosophy and sociology of science and technology, adapted for students who might have never had classes on social or political theory before. Some knowledge of philosophy (at the high school level) is presupposed, though. The class should provide natural, exact or data science specialists with basic knowledge of the sociology of everyday life, anthropology of science, sociology of complex socio-technical systems, and social aspects of the impending climate change

Disrupt Skoltech Hackathon, 31 hours (I-39-19)

Credits:1.15

Disrupt Skoltech hackathon has the goal to develop Skoltech Social network (something like Linked In + Facebook + …) which may be used as base for better connection in our community, leading to alumni network, base for search for mentors and several other ideas students came with.

Short-term Research Project (MA0200R1)

Credits:2

Materials Selection in Design (MA030099)

Credits:3

This course illustrates the need for a scientific and practical method of selection of appropriate materials for industrial application. It includes review of the principles of materials science including materials classification, hierarchical structuring, related properties, and performance of different class of materials such as natural materials, metals, ceramics, plastics, cellular solids. Ashby’s material selection algorithm for rational selection of materials for specific applications will be taught here in comprehensive way - analysis of function, objectives and constraints, deducing of performance indices. All the concepts covered in lectures will be practiced by using a commercially available software known as CES EduPack to implement data intensive learning. Team projects are aimed to taste the CDIO approach in Materials Selection.

Short-term Research Project (MA0300R1)

Credits:3

Short-term Research Project (MA0300R2)

Credits:3

Additional Thesis Research (MA0300RT)

Credits:3

Computational Imaging (MA030121)

Credits:3

In the computational era of everything, imaging has not become an exception. Computational algorithms allow both to extract valuable information from a scene and to improve the very sensor that forms the image. Today, computational and image processing enhancements became integrable parts of any digital imager, be it a miniature smartphone camera or a complex space telescope. This crash course is designed as a prerequisite for those students who would like to venture into the field of Computer Vision. We will cover foundational mathematical equations that are involved in the image formation and in the geometric projection principles. The concept of Point Spread Function that distorts the object will be explained on particular examples and will be experimented with for the tasks of image reconstruction and denoising. Image processing will be covered with an emphasis on the Python libraries to be used in the rest of the imaging-related courses on the DS/IST tracks (openCV and others). A basic DSLR photo camera will be considered as a model for understanding Fourier Imaging and Filtering methods in a short laboratory exercise. Hands-on tutorial on how to select a camera and a lens for your machine vision application will be provided. The theory of color and stereo light-field cameras will be covered using the models of commonplace Bayern RGB sensors; as well as state-of-art spectral and multi-lens imagers. An overview of practical regularization recipes for these cameras will be given. The course will consist of three theoretical lectures riffled by three graded in-class laboratory coding sessions on the subjects covered in the theoretical lectures. 100% attendance is mandatory. There will be a single in-class exam during the evaluation week and no homeworks.

Modern Convex Optimization (MA030137)

Credits:3

Transgenic Models in Drug Discovery (MA030223)

Credits:3

Plant Molecular Biology Lab Course (MA030330)

Credits:3

Plant Biotechnology Lab Course (MA030331)

Credits:3

Introduction to Computer Vision (MA030348)

Credits:3

Computer Vision is one of the most rapidly evolving subfields of Computer Science with many applications, e. g. in autonomous driving and healthcare, among others. This course is designed to provide a comprehensive systematic introduction to the field. We'll start with the recognition of some simple object elements such as corners and edges and then proceed to the detection of more complex local features. All major problem statements such as object detection and semantic segmentation as well as the corresponding classical algorithms will be covered in the second part of the course. Finally, we'll briefly introduce convolutional networks and discuss key deep learning architectures for the same set of problems. We'll extensively use Python and CV & image analysis libraries scikit-image and OpenCV during hands-ons and homeworks. The final grade will be calculated using the results of two in-class projects, one homework and the final project.

High Performance Python Lab (MA030367)

Credits:3

This course is devoted to learning how to use Python for High Performance Computing on different architectures – multi-core CPUs and general purpose GPUs. The course is oriented on practical knowledge, where the students will get a hands-on experience with Python code profiling, modern Python frameworks, such as Python MultiProcessing, Numba, Cython, mpi4py, PyCuda and others. Wide range of problem sets from linear algebra, image processing, deep learning, physics and engineering makes this course interesting and suitable for all levels of students from all CREIs. Students will also get the possibility to work on modern supercomputers.

Molecular Neurobiology (MA030391)

Credits:3

The Molecular Neurobiology course gives students the basics of molecular organization and functional principles of the central nervous system. This is a theoretical course, describing the current vision of how the central nervous system works at the cellular, subcellular, and molecular levels. The course will also introduce current methods used to assess the functional organization of the nervous system at the molecular level, with a particular focus on studies of the human brain. The course will include both the textbook information, as well as recent findings not yet included in textbooks.

Neuroendocrinology (MA030392)

Credits:3

The course helps TAs and PhD students to understand and try pedagogical tools to get versatile collaborative, inquiring and educational experience. The course interactively leads through basic teacher fundamentals – competences, learning outcomes, and student-centered education and demonstrates teachers’ practices and technologies for organizing group work, problem-based education, project-based learning, case study, etc. The course also covers evaluation and feedback as a part of effective learning. Modules of the course are supplemented by interactive exercises to engage students in discussion and re-thinking on their experience concepts and technologies. Participants will design their own education event as the final project. Also during the course participants will take several practicums to upgrade presentation skills, skills for keeping education projects on track, skills of curriculum and outcome design.

Fundamentals of Post-Quantum Cryptography (MA030394)

Credits:3

Permafrost and Natural Hydrates (MA03343)

Credits:3

Core Course Description

Short-term Research Project (MA0500R1)

Credits:5

Introduction to Language Technologies and Their Applications (MA060029)

Credits:6

Short-term Research Project (MA0600R1)

Credits:6

Short-term Research Project (MA0600R2)

Credits:6

Additional Thesis Research (MA0600RT)

Credits:6

Advanced Quantum Mechanics (MA060207)

Credits:6

Lecture Course “Advanced Quantum Mechanics” comprises a number of topics which are not included in standard courses on Quantum Mechanics. Meanwhile, these topics acquire increasing importance during last 2-3 decades due to developing applications in various branches of quantum condensed-matter physics theory dealing with many-body problems and problems of interaction between quantum particle and external bath. The first set of topics refer to nontrivial examples of adiabatic or weakly non-adiabatic behavior of quantum system: Berry phases, Landau-Zener tunneling (including Feynman path integral representation for tunneling phenomena). Secondly, we will study non-adiabatic phenomena due to interaction between quantum particle and surrounding media, including: orthogonality catastrophe, density matrix formalism and decoherence. Third part of the course is devoted to the theory of dissipation in Quantum Mechanics

Numerical Methods in Continuum Mechanics (MA060242)

Credits:6

The objective of the course is to provide students with an overview of the modern computational approaches for solving continuum mechanics problems with the emphasis on advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics methods. The course will discuss competing formulations, suitable for continuum mechanics problems, i.e. finite difference, finite element, finite volume, and spectral methods. The course will discuss a variety of topics such as the methods of solution of elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic systems of equations and application of the methods for solution of compressible and incompressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations as well as solid mechanics problems. Modern approaches for mesh generation and solution of hyperbolic conservation laws will be also discussed.

Advanced PLM techniques: Product Prototyping (MA060253)

Credits:6

Advanced PLM techniques: Testing and Models Validation (MA060254)

Credits:6

Geometric Modeling (MA060297)

Credits:6

Classification, principles and techniques of digital modelling of point sets are presented for points, curves, surfaces and solids. Specifically these include methods of modelling of point clouds, depth fields, parametric curves and surfaces, implicit surfaces and solids. Solid modelling includes such representations as Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG), Boundary Representation (BRep) with polygonal meshes and parametric surfaces, sweeping, spatial occupancy enumeration, and Function Representation (FRep).

Advanced Manufacturing of Composite Materials (MA060298)

Credits:6

This course is developed to give students a broad background and hands on experience in manufacturing of advanced composite materials. Both materials and manufacturing methods are discussed. A brief introduction to advanced composite materials and processes is presented. The course is focused on the innovative non-autoclave technologies of thermosetting resin based/fiber reinforced advanced composites. Manufacturing is covered in terms of the major steps required to fabricate laminated composite parts. These will be described and discussed in details and worked out experimentally through conducting a set of lab projects. The following technologies and methods will be covered: Vacuum Infusion, Press Molding, Pultrusion, Filament Winding, and Mechanical Testing. Typical problems of materials, tooling, cure, and technological defects will be discussed.

Heterogeneous Volume Modeling and Digital Fabrication (MA060299)

Credits:6

The course covers methods and techniques of digital modeling of volumetric point sets with attributes presenting pointwise properties such as material fractions, color, and other volumetric object properties. Modelled objects are characterized by complex volumetric geometry, multi-scale microstructures and volumetric multi-material density distribution. Stress will be made on using continuous and discrete scalar fields for modelling both geometry and attributes. Associated methods of multi-material digital fabrication will be outlined.

Quantum Computer Programming (MA060393)

Credits:6

Short-term Research Project (MA0900R1)

Credits:9

Additional Thesis Research (MA0900RT)

Credits:9

Short-term Research Project (MA1200R1)

Credits:12

Industrial Project (MB0400S1)

Credits:4

Industrial Project (MB0600S1)

Credits:6

Industrial Project (MB0600S2)

Credits:6

Industrial Project (MB0800S1)

Credits:8

Industrial Project (MB0900S1)

Credits:9

Industrial Immersion (MB120005)

Credits:12

The goal of Industrial Immersion is to provide for Skoltech students real hands-on work experience in industrial sector and develop the knowledge and skills for making impact through engineering and innovation. The Industrial immersion is performed in a company and it implies that internships at academic or research institutions (like universities etc.) are excluded. Duration of Industrial Immersion is 8 weeks. Project focuses on short-term development, manufacturing or operations challenges rather than long-term research problems and is co-supervised by the company and Skoltech. The internship is cooperatively planned: project assignment is provided by the company and subject for approval of the Industrial Immersion Program Coordinator (I.I.P.C.).

Industrial Project (MB1200S1)

Credits:12

Technology Entrepreneurship: Foundation (MC030008)

Credits:3

The course target is to help you to understand technology entrepreneurship process (e.g. creation of a technology-based startup or a new business stream within an established company) from a technology-oriented background. The course is designed primarily for the students: - having intention to join a startup or initiate their own tech focused venture; - interested in "corporate innovations" in hi-tech businesses. As a framework for the course we use the “battle proven” approaches as “Disciplined Entrepreneurship” (Bill Aulet, MIT) and “Customer Development” (Steve Blank, UC Berkeley & Stanford). The course will have team- and project-based active learning formats with the combination of class lectures, “real-live” cases, in class and homework assignments (including “get out of the building and interview entrepreneur and/or customer” exercises!) as well as guest speakers’ sessions and teams’ activities and report outs. In the course you will be studying such topics as opportunity recognition and market evaluation, forming a startup team, start-up strategies, gathering resources, entrepreneurial marketing, revenue streams and pricing, as well as other you will need to know to increase your odds in putting a new technology to use and commercial success. Special emphasis is given to provide you with networking opportunities and connections within Skolkovo innovation ecosystem. The course serves as an introduction and prerequisite for the further in-depth E&I courses: Product Innovation (Term 3, new tech products & services design in cooperation with external business partners) and Technology Entrepreneurship: advanced (Term 4, deep-dive into your startup projects).

Leadership for Innovators (MC030011)

Credits:3

Succesful innovators are distinguished not only by their scientific excellence as well as end user vision, but also by superior leadership skills. Scientists dream about being honored and awarded by fans on the merits of their science alone, but unfortunately it never works this way. Innovation is impossible without leading, cooperating, negotiating, and keeping resilience from the constant stress. This course presents the comprehensive skillset of leadership that includes theory and practice of: - leadership & teamwork - self-awareness and goal setting - stress management and self-presentation - empathy and 360 feedback - influence & negotiations The recurring topic of the class is that all these beneficial skills are fuzzy and overrated unless they are taken together in the globally accepted framework of "Emotional Intelligence" (EQ). The class is built as highly interactive action that starts with Q&A on a particular component of the EQ toolkit and then culminates in the intensive group and personal exercises. Unlike your favorite hard skill classes, this course is light on homework, but hard on class participation. Student should be ready to attend at all costs or face course failure. If you miss the class, you steal learning experience not only from yourself, but also from the entire group, hence consequences will be serious. Please note that this class is 80% similar to the ISP combo of "Hardcore EQ" and "Negotiation games" so you may optimize your learning schedule.

Product Innovation: User-Centered & Iterative Design Process (MC030012)

Credits:3

The course is a practical introduction to the product management and product innovation process. We will deal with the challenge of delivering to market new successful tech-based products/services addressing real need and providing great customer experience. The core of the course is a structured Product Innovation Process featuring user-focused & iterative product design and combining marketing, engineering and business perspectives. The process is universally applicable to the product design in startup or established company, to the offerings targeting consumer segment or a corporate end user, to physical products or digital services. Within this hands-on immersive course, you are to run a team-based projects. In the projects you will deal with the challenge to discover customer needs, turn them into product concepts, iterate and validate your designs through prototyping and user tests. This will enable you to put into practice the course tools and techniques as well as to create your own “product innovation” professional portfolio. The projects will be done in collaboration with real startups/ventures facing the challenges of a new product design. (If you have your own idea/startup you would like to run as the course project, please contact instructor). The course prepares you to the career of Product Manager in tech company/startup. For this, we will balance key methodologies for the user-centered product design (e.g. Customer Development & Lean Startup, Design Thinking, Business Model Innovation) with the "deep dive" into prospective technologies and markets in the areas of Digital, Internet of Things, New Materials & Manufacturing, etc.

Biomedical Innovation and Entrepreneurship (MC030013)

Credits:3

The course aims to provide students with an understanding of applications and practices of biomedical science in an industrial healthcare. To put it simple, we will discuss where and how Skoltech biomedical graduates may employ their skills beyond academy science. To achieve this goal the course will decompose the industry into the value chain of independent but interconnected entities and then make deep investigation of motives, profits, and costs of any segment/entity of this value chain. The incomplete list of such entities will include: R&D-driven startups, CROs, CMOs, regulators, integrated pharmas, marketing agents, distributors, retail, hospitals, doctors. The emphasis will be made on the value chain groups that are immersed into the challendge of transforming high technologies into the tangible patient benefit, from hardcore drug development to all kinds of medical devices and services. Such challenges will be taught through development of the group project that will be developed through the stages of Problem statement (indication, regulation, POC and QC), preclinical design, clinical design, manufacturing/delivery design and final integrative presentation.

Business Communication (MC030014)

Credits:3

Business Communication is an intensive hands on, practical course, designed to provide Skoltech students with the set of skills needed to effectively communicate with others – their classmates, working teams, professors and any audiences inside and outside of Skoltech. The course learning outcomes correspond directly with the Group 3 of Skoltech learning outcomes – “Relating to Others – Communication and Collaboration”. The course will show students the secrets and technologies to becoming confident when speaking in public – developing the skills they will be able to use throughout their career and their life. In a highly interactive, informative and supportive manner through in-class activities, games and simulations the course will enable students to: Speak with confidence and overcome their nervousness; Establish rapport with any audience; Present their message in a clear, concise, and engaging manner; Successfully manage impression they make onto audience; Create—and repurpose—presentations quickly and efficiently; Make successful and memorable pitch; Sharpen the story they want to tell; Use confidently body language and movement, strengthening their speech; Respond to questions and comments without getting flustered; Gain people’s attention, respect, and cooperation.

Technology Entrepreneurship: Advanced (MC030015)

Credits:3

The course expands “Technology Entrepreneurship: Foundation” class towards the topics related to primary market research and customer discovery, product prototyping and testing with users, innovations marketing, business modeling, etc. It is designed to help students to master practical application of entrepreneurship frameworks and transfer their own early stage projects/ideas (= guesses & hopes for new tech biz) into viable biz concepts, validated prototypes/products, and, finally, fundable companies. This is an active learning course. It deals with the first-hand experience of all the pressure and demands of the real world in an early stage technological startup. Students will work as a team and deal with market/technology uncertainty. They will get out of the classroom to learn from the marketplace and to check if anyone other than the idea authors would want/use their product. And, finally, based on market feedback students will rapidly iterate their products into something customers would really use and buy. As a framework for the course we use the “battle proven” approaches as “Disciplined Entrepreneurship” (Bill Aulet, MIT) and “Customer Development” (Steve Blank, UC Berkeley & Stanford). Course benefits: • Learn the advanced and practical skills in the area of Technology Entrepreneurship & Innovations • Develop Lean Startup mindset/skillsets and build competence in customer, business model and agile development • Connect to top-notch mentors, investors and fellow entrepreneurs and get coaching opportunities • Create your “entrepreneurship portfolio” and propel your projects up to viable products, biz concepts, funding opportunities, etc.

Technological Innovations: from Research Results to Commercial Product (MC030016)

Credits:3

The course is about managing applied Research and Development, critical analysis of new emerging technologies, transferring research results and discoveries into successful products. Research and development process in a company or in a technical university is usually application and product oriented. There are usually no universal rules on how to distinguish a commercially perspective research result / technology from many others; neither there are standard paths for commercializing scientific results. Intuition and skills come with practice. So, in this course, practical skills and experience will be developed. Students will go through multiple real cases of successful commercialization of research results in various technological fields - materials science, nanotechnology, photonics, space, chemistry, data science, energy etc. They will see and practice in how a research result from a laboratory can be transferred into a product, find its customer and market and, finally, become commercially successful. Opposite situations (that are, in fact, more common) will be studied equally carefully: when originally promising technologies did not make its way into a product - due to multiple reasons that will be analyzed. The lecturers will be balanced with practical work. The real-life conditions will be modelled as much as possible – aimed to develop hands-on skills and experience in critical evaluation of new technologies, comparing them to existing alternative solutions, finding a proper product realization and a market niche. Students are expected to go through technological innovation process themselves and then to compare, when possible, their results to the real stories of successes and failures. Students will apply their learnings to their current research – considering their own results and/or results of their colleagues and collaborators from the point of view of commercialization potential, finding right target market, realizing a competitive product.

Technology Planning and Roadmapping: Foundation (MC030017)

Credits:3

Technology Planning and Roadmapping (TPR) is a key corporate function that companies put in place to understand, manage, and define technology strategy. The main goals of TPR are: 1) to provide understanding on current technology investments in the company (portfolio management); 2) to identify technology investment options for future products and services (landscaping); 3) to benchmark the company’s technology strategy against market competition and accounting for global technology trends (benchmarking); 4) to valuate future financial benefits, risks, and technical feasibility of envisioned technology investments (valuating); 5) to prioritize technology investments by analyzing potential future scenarios while accounting for corporate strategic drivers (prioritizing); and ultimately 6) to formulate recommendations for research and development (R&D) investments based on the definition of a rigorous technology strategy (planning). Technology Planning and Roadmapping: Foundations (TPR:F) covers the theoretical fundamentals of technology planning and roadmapping, including fundamental concepts, an overview of the most common tools and processes used by practitioners in the field, and application examples from companies in different sectors. In short, TPR:F is about building the intellectual foundations that will allow students to collaboratively build a TPR system for an industrial organization. The main deliverable of TPR:F is the development of a technology roadmap for a student startup or reverse-engineering of the roadmap of a company of interest to the student.

Technology Planning and Roadmapping: Advanced (MC030018)

Credits:3

• Technology Planning and Roadmapping: Advanced (TPR:A): this course represents the practical application of the tools taught in TPR:F. It provides students the opportunity to practice hands on the real issues that arise in implementing a TPR system in industrial organizations, and to develop an actual technology roadmap in class team-work. The best technology roadmaps coming from different class editions may be published online or in international peer-reviewed venues, with students as lead authors (Scopus-indexed conferences or journals). TPR:A is about using the TPR system to explore a cutting-edge technology area of choice of the class, among those aligned with major trends occurring worldwide across different technology sectors of relevance to Skoltech (Biomed, Energy, IT, and Space). The main deliverable of TPR:A is a group-based technology roadmap report. Students will develop in teams a sector-wide technology roadmap, to be later presented as a report.

Developing Products and Services through Design Thinking (MC030022)

Credits:3

Entrepreneurial Strategy (MC030023)

Credits:3

Startup Workshop (MC030025)

Credits:3

Entrepreneurial Finance (MC030028)

Credits:3

Technological Innovations: from Research Results to a Commercial Product (MC030028)

Credits:3

Developing Products and Services through Design Thinking (MC030029)

Credits:3

Entrepreneurship & Innovation Project (MC0300I1)

Credits:3

Innovation Workshop (MC060001)

Credits:6

The Innovation Workshop (IW) is a one-month full-time “boot camp” MS-level course that unites the entire Skoltech incoming class with faculty and esteemed invited mentors to create the foundational experience in Entrepreneurship and Innovation (E&I) for all. IW is designed to instill a positive “can-do” teamwork attitude in the Skoltech culture, as well as to cultivate the art of prototyping quickly, under pressure, with help from others, and based on whatever resources are at hand here and now. . Experiential inquiry-based learning leads IW student through the entire technology innovation cycle along the three pillars of innovation: (i) Impact (Problem + Feedback), (ii) Novelty of the solution (IP + Prototype + Science), and (iii) Vision for the subsequent iterations (Next Steps + Picture of Success). This work is performed in cross-disciplinary teams operating under time pressure thus creating real life experience of complex innovation project. . This file is the abbreviated version of the IW syllabus that carries only the most technical summary information. Please find the full IW Syllabus in the Files section of your IW Canvas page, as well as the attachement to this submission (the clickable "Upload" URL in the bottom of this document). Students of the IW are strongly recommended to read the full Syllabus as it carries plenty of information necessary to succeed in the IW and in innovation in general. .

Ideas to Impact (MC060002)

Credits:6

Technological innovation is critical to the survival and competitiveness of emerging and existing organizations. This course lays the foundation to undertake a robust analysis and design of opportunities for technology-based commercialization. We introduce tools and frameworks that help isolate and control the factors shaping the identification, evaluation and development of commercial opportunities. Throughout the course we use technology examples originating from problem sets found in engineering and scientific education to develop the skills necessary to connect technology and impact. At the same time, through creativity lab students will be introduced to a variety of creative problem solving techniques and learn how to apply these techniques in the context of the development, evaluation and application of ideas and concepts with commercial potential; consider the evaluation of business ideas that translate existing business models into new national contexts. The course is designed to help students develop the ability to find, evaluate, and develop technological ideas into commercially viable product and process concepts, and build those concepts into viable business propositions. The material covered is research and theory-based but the course is practice-oriented with much of the term spent on shaping technology-based opportunities. A central objective of this subject is to equip students with an understanding of the main issues involved in the commercialization of technological advances at both strategic and operational levels.

Intellectual Property and Technological Innovation (MC060006)

Credits:6

Intellectual property (IP) is a critically important aspect of technological innovation and a key factor in the management of technology-intensive enterprises. Basic knowledge of intellectual property principles and practices is increasingly important for university researchers, and expertise in the management of intellectual property is a key skill set of technology leaders in both established corporations and entrepreneurial ventures. Intellectual property affects not only technology commercialization strategy but also the direction of scientific research itself. University research groups increasingly compete with each other for scientific reputation and access to resources on the basis of their ability to obtain patent protection for the practical applications of their research; but also on the basis of their ability to plot research pathways to maneuver around the "proprietary territory" of other research groups. Skill in using IP data bases, and associated analytical tools, can empower university scientific teams to craft more powerful research strategies. This course will survey basic concepts of intellectual property and provide an introduction to a variety of types of intellectual property and IP-related rights, such as patents, copyright, trade secrets, trademarks, design rights, database rights, domain names, and demarcations of origin. The classroom sessions will include lively discussions of case studies of the management of IP and the resolution of IP-related problems in the process of technology commercialization. Each student will conduct an analysis of intellectual property issues related to his or her own Ph.D. research topic. Use will be made of special IP data and IP analytics tools.

Technology Entrepreneurship: Foundation (MC060008)

Credits:6

Thinking Disruptive for a Big Future (MC060010)

Credits:6

The goal is to open the mind of the audience showing that there is not only one predetermined path for a career after the studies, that the world is big, fantastic and that the problems we face are huge, but fascinating. The goal is also to show that there is no, or should not be any Chinese Wall between mathematicians, physicists and engineers. Finally, the goal is to show how some ideas, some of them being very theoretical and some others not, can bring to the creation of startups. It will rely on the more than 30 years of experience of Jean-Francois Geneste who will exemplify with encountered concrete examples he met along his career. We shall go through "the law of the mean", disruptive systems (airships, pseudo-satellites, launchers, mining in space, fractionation and responsive space), disruptive equipment (infinite impulse propulsion, CVC jet engine, thermal solar arrays), systems intrinsically resistant to terrorist attacks, Disruptive science... The students should understand also that the current fashion of thinking that breakthrough innovation is dedicated to the yougsters is not true. Of course, it will be proved that breakthrough innovation can occur, as used to say Einstein, can occur when many enough of the supporters of the former order are dead, but it also requires deep knowledge, which, to some extent, is only possible from a certain age. Because there are 2 kinds of disruptive innovations. And this is one of the interests of this course to explain what the two kinds are so that the students know and can make a choice if they really decide to be involved in disruptive innovation.

Hack Lab: Laboratory for Ideas (MC060024)

Credits:6

IoT: Launching New Products & Startups (MC060026)

Credits:6

Intellectual Property, Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship (MC060027)

Credits:6

Entrepreneurship & Innovation Project (MC0600I1)

Credits:6

Thesis Research Project (MD030002)

Credits:3

Thesis Proposal (MD030023a)

Credits:3

Thesis Status Review (MD030023b)

Credits:3

Thesis Pre-defense (MD030023c)

Credits:3

Thesis Defence (MD060003)

Credits:6

Thesis Defence (MD090003)

Credits:9

English for MS Thesis (ME030034)

Credits:3

The Course offers concise and practical guidelines for writing and defending a Master Thesis at Skoltech. The course focuses on the specifics of the main parts of the paper in terms of structure, vocabulary and grammar, and their transformations for a presentation with slides. The course is designed to develop a conscious approach to own writing through thorough analyses of the best authentic examples combined with intensive writing and editing practice. The ‘process-for-product’ approach teaches the students to write - use (peer) reviewer’s advice – revise/edit – repeat and creates linguistic awareness needed to avoid the typical pitfalls.

Additional Thesis Research (ME030040)

Credits:3

Short-Term Project (ME030041)

Credits:3

Additional Thesis Research (ME060040)

Credits:6

Short-Term Project (ME060041)

Credits:6

Practicum in Experimental Physics 2 (ME060208)

Credits:6

Additional Thesis Research (ME090040)

Credits:9

Short-Term Project (ME090041)

Credits:9

English Toolkit (MF030001)

Credits:3

English Toolkit (MF030001)

Credits:3

The goal of the English Toolkit course is to activate Academic English skills required for successful education at Skoltech. The students will practice Academic vocabulary and grammar, as well as boost their reading, writing and speaking skills. The blended format includes a weekly online workload plus an offline group tutorial providing a flexible and individualised learning trajectory. Real-time feedback in online exercises will be complimented by tutor feedback for the writing and speaking assignments.

Academic Writing Essentials (MF030002)

Credits:3

Academic writing skills are necessary for effective research, innovation, and educational activities in a multinational setting. The aim of the course is to provide guidelines and strategies for writing academic texts, focusing on relevant aspects of grammar, vocabulary, and style. The course includes analysis and practice of various forms of scientific and technical writing, and builds writing skills from sentences to paragraph structure, from summary to abstract, and lays the foundations for writing scientific papers and Master Thesis. Modern science is, for most purposes, a collective collaborative effort, so the course is designed to promote individual and group responsibility by providing mutually related and time-dependent tasks, such as peer review. The course is writing-intensive with ample opportunity to practice editing and peer-reviewing.

Master Your Thesis in English 1 (Multidisciplinary) (MF030003)

Credits:3

The key to efficient professional communication is the ability to convey ideas clearly, coherently and correctly both orally and in writing. The Course offers concise and practical guidelines for writing and defending a Master Thesis at Skoltech. The course focuses on the main parts of the Thesis in terms of structure, vocabulary and grammar, and their transformations for a presentation with slides. Students will develop a conscious approach to own writing and presentations through thorough analyses of the best authentic examples combined with intensive writing and editing practice. The ‘process-for-product’ approach teaches the students to write - use (peer) reviewer’s advice – revise/edit – repeat, and creates linguistic awareness needed to avoid the typical pitfalls. The Course is offered in two modules which gradually build on the necessary writing and presentation skills.

Master Your English for Thesis (MF030003l)

Credits:3

Master Your Thesis in English 2 (Multidisciplinary) (MF030004)

Credits:3

Master Your Thesis in English (MF060003)

Credits:6

Master Your Thesis in English 2 (MF060004)

Credits:6

Crystallographic Methods (TA020279)

Credits:2

Physical Chemistry Analysis in Solid-state Physics (TA020281)

Credits:2

Image Processing (TA030006)

Credits:3

Non-linear Optimization Methods (TA030251)

Credits:3

Modern Algorithmic Optimization (TA030252)

Credits:3

Modeling of Mineral Reactions in Deforming Rocks (TA030274)

Credits:3

Introduction to Modern Quantum Calculations of Molecules and Crystalls (TA030278)

Credits:3

Tomography and Squeezed States in Quantum Optics and Quantum Mechanics (TA030282)

Credits:3

Simulation and Optimization Methods (TA030292)

Credits:3

Electromagnetic Compatibility Theory and Radio Frequency Distribution (TA030300)

Credits:3

Time Series Analysis (TA030338)

Credits:3

Quantum Electrodynamics (TA030398)

Credits:3

Solid-state Chemistry (TA050280)

Credits:5

Mathematics of Science (TA050306)

Credits:5

Modern Methods of Data Analysis: Stochastic Calculus (TA060109)

Credits:6

Electron Microscopy (TA060110)

Credits:6

Communication Theory (TE050297)

Credits:5