Course Information

for _Default Department

 

Research Methodology: CDMM Research Seminar (DA030102dm)

Credits:3

This is the main research seminar for the Skoltech Center for Design, Manufacturing and Materials (CDMM). All MSc students either enrolled into the Master Program in Advanced Manufacturing Technologies or PhD students affiliated with CDMM should attend this seminar. The format of the seminar is weekly invited lectures from top scientists in the research fields related to Advanced Manufacturing, Digital Engineering Technologies, and Mechanics and Physics of Advanced Manufacturing will be given.

Multi-Scale Mechanics of Materials (DA030496)

Credits:3

This course provides a broad base treatment of the core subject of mechanics of materials considered at different organisational and structural scales, from atoms to nanocrystals to micron-sized grains and solid phase particles, and ultimately to millimeter to meter-sized objects and assemblies. The two-track approach taken in this course will systematically combine theoretical descriptions appropriate for the analysis at different scales with the corresponding experimental implementations, measurement and observation techniques, and interpretation approaches. At the macroscopic level, classical mechanics concepts of stress and strain will be introduced. The continuum mechanics modelling frameworks for elastic-plastic deformation will be presented, along with large strain descriptors. Mechanical testing methods will be described, and the importance of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) will be highlighted. Fracture mechanics will be introduced in the context of linear elastic and least-plastic behaviour. The framework for modelling crystal plasticity will be presented, and examples drawn from EBSD and Laue micro-beam diffraction analyses. Nanomechanics of materials will be presented, along with nano indentation and other small scale mechanical testing methods. At the atomic level, first principles and molecular dynamics approaches will be touched, and AFM, TEM and atom probe characterisation methods will be introduced, along with geometric phase analysis and 2D Fourier transform methods of interpretation. The concept of hierarchically structured materials will be presented, and examples discussed drawn from natural and engineered materials.

Innovation and Intellectual Property Studies Doctoral Seminar (DC060009)

Credits:6

Startup Founders Workshop (DC060023)

Credits:6

Thesis Final Review: Mathematics and Mechanics (DD060037mm)

Credits:6

Preparation for Pedagogy (DE000006)

Credits:0

Preparation for Pedagogy [DE000006] is a pre-requisite for Pedagogy of Higher Education course [DG030025] only for the first year PhD students. Please enroll in this shell-course when you already have an arrangement with a course instructor to be a technical Teaching Assistant. This does not mean that you will be leading lectures or seminars. Instead, you might help with grading, populating the course page in Canvas, material and paper preparation for classes and assist with other technical tasks.

Academic Communication: Preparatory English for Phd Exam (DE030029)

Credits:3

Efficient professional communication is the key to Academic success. The course is designed for PhD students who want to maximize their academic potential by boosting their ability to write research papers, present in front of multidisciplinary audiences, participate in scholarly discussions and engage in other forms of academic communication. The main goal of the course is to enable PhD students to produce clear, correct, concise and coherent texts acceptable for the international professional community. The course is designed for a multi-disciplinary audience. The course serves as a preparation for the qualification language exam, which is a prerequisite for the Thesis defense.

Teachers Toolkit for Higher Education (DE030039)

Credits:3

Academic Communication: Preparatory English for Phd Exam (DF030029)

Credits:3

As a PhD student, you should already know that effective professional communication is the key to academic success. Are you an ambitious person who wants to maximize their academic potential? Are you eager to boost your ability to write research papers, present in front of multidisciplinary audiences, participate in scholarly discussions and engage in other forms of academic communication -- and do it all in good academic English? Join this course and learn how to produce clear, correct, concise, and coherent texts related to your research, and how to present your data in front of a multidisciplinary professional community. You will be guided through all stages of paper writing, editing, peer-reviewing, and presenting. The course is aligned with the NATURE MASTERCLASS available to Skoltech researchers, so you will be able to benefit from professional recommendations of the Nature experts regarding the structure and contents of a publication, and constructive feedback from your Instructor on the language of your materials. Academic communication is not limited to formal writing and professional presentation. As in a real conference environment, you will take part in networking activities, interacting with your peers from different fields, exchanging ideas and pitching your research achievements. The course is interactive, communicative and intensive, with various speaking, listening, reading and writing activities, to be performed in class and at home, individually and in teams. By the end of the course, successful participants will - know the rules and conventions of research paper writing, including structure, style, grammar and vocabulary; - improve their academic communication skills, such as active listening, spontaneous and rehearsed speaking/ presentation, reading and writing within a given academic genre; - have experience in writing, editing, peer-reviewing and presenting research results.

English. Candidate Examinations (DG030003)

Credits:3

This is a blended meta-course for the English Qualification Exam needed for the Russian PhD Degree. The Exam is designed as a multidisciplinary conference where the participants present results of their PhD research and follows the general principles of conference materials submission, peer review, resubmission, presentation, and discussion. The goal of the Exam is Academic Communication, so the participants should demonstrate the ability to present their research results in front of a multidisciplinary audience and deliver the key ideas in good Academic English in terms of vocabulary, grammar and style. Pre-exam/ pre-conference activities, such as material submissions and peer reviews, last of three weeks and take place fully online. They include: Project proposal V1+ 2 Peer Reviews; a 2-minute video annotation V1 + peer review; and a stack of presentation slides V1+ peer review. Version 2 of the Proposal, video annotation and the slides should be improved using the comments of the Instructor and the peers. Depending on the applicable regulations related to COVID-19, on the Examination day students make their presentations and participate in the discussion in person or via an online platform in front of the Examination Committee and a group of peers. Failure to submit an assignment by the due date may result in the loss of the grade. The participants will practice a variety of academic skills: - Planning and designing a well-structured and balanced presentation - Formulating and negotiating the research ideas through the process of writing and peer editing. - Communicating research-related ideas to a multi-disciplinary audience. - Presentation skills: the ability to deliver the message using a variety of rhetorical and stylistic tools. - Discussion skills: the ability to tackle a variety of questions from the audience. The ability to pose questions to the presenters. The grade is counted towards the PhD Qualification.

Pedagogical Experience (DG030005)

Credits:3

The main function of this course is to articulate Skoltech's expectations on PhD students who do their pedagogical TA assignment at Skoltech. The course describes the intended learning outcomes and how they are assessed. The main bulk of the 81 hours of the course is spent in the actual courses in which the PhD-students do their TA-assignments. The assignments in the course itself include TA proposal and TA report and require less than 6 hours of work. Your course instructor and Educational department should approve both assignments in Canvas in terms of content and formal requirements respectively.

Qualifying Exam (DG030020)

Credits:3

Pedagogy of Higher Education (DG030025)

Credits:3

The course offers an introduction to facilitating learning in higher education for PhD students who are asked to act as teaching assistants or supervisors. The course content focuses on aligning learning outcomes with learning activities and assessment strategies. Constructive alignment in the course is defined at high resolution such that learning outcomes for a course are elaborated into separate activities and assignments for students. In other words, learning outcomes need to be articulated at every level of learning activities from course to assignment. The course also rests on the approach that learning is promoted by feedback. The assessment design that participants in the course design will therefore be required to reflect significant and effective use of continuous formative assessment. Such formative assessment requires strategic learning activities and assignments, and the course therefore comes with an emphasis on communication-to-learn activities including peer learning. Skoltech is an English medium instruction environment, and the course contains discussion topics to highlight ways of addressing the potential effects of language and culture barriers for high quality student learning. All topics in the course are applied by participants on their own teaching and learning experiences and are meant to be used as they prepare and plan for their teaching assistantships or their supervisory activities to come. All participants will have a task to produce a reflection on their future actions to evolve as facilitators and meet the requirements of the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Facilitating and Assessing Learning (DG030030)

Credits:3

The course offers an introduction to facilitating learning in higher education for junior faculty together with PhD student TAs. The course content focuses on aligning learning outcomes with learning activities and assessment strategies. Constructive alignment in the course is defined at high resolution such that learning outcomes for a course are elaborated into separate activities and assignments for students. In other words, learning outcomes need to be articulated at every level of learning activities from course to assignment. The course also rests on the approach that learning is promoted by feedback. The assessment design that participants in the course design will therefore be required to reflect significant and effective use of continuous formative assessment. Such formative assessment requires strategic learning activities and assignments, and the course therefore comes with an emphasis on communication-to-learn activities including peer learning. Skoltech is an English medium instruction environment, and the course contains discussion topics to highlight ways of addressing the potential effects of language and culture barriers for high quality student learning. All topics in the course are applied by participants on their own teaching and learning experiences and are meant to be used as they prepare and plan for their teaching and course development or their supervisory activities. All participants will have a task to produce a reflection on their future actions to evolve as facilitators and meet the requirements of the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Teachers Toolkit for Higher Education (DG030039)

Credits:3

History and Philosophy of Science. Candidate Examinations (DG060026)

Credits:6

The aim of this course is to give to Skoltech students and postgraduates basic information about the main stages of the development of science from its birth in Ancient Greece through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance to Modern Times and to the great scientific revolutions of the XX century. Every man of culture especially a future scientist should know the impact of such great thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, John Buridan, Nicholas of Cusa, Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Boscovich, Darwin, Mendel, Bohr and Einstein (omitting many other brilliant names, that would be spoken about in the frames of the course) to the development of a scientific picture of the universe. Also there will be discussed the main topics and notions of the philosophy of science: demarcation between science and humanities, Popper’s theory of falsification, Kuhn’s theory of scientific revolutions, philosophical ideas of Lakatos and Feyerabend. The course will consist of 18 3-hour lectures and 6 examination sessions (3 hour each). The students are to submit 6 written essays in English on the following themes: 1. Ancient Greek and Roman Science; 2. Medieval and Renaissance Science; 3. Scientific Revolution of the XVII century; 4. Science in the XVIII and XIX century; 5. Science in the XX-XXI centuries; 6. Philosophy of Science. For the final exam the students should prepare 10-15 minutes oral presentation on the scientific problem they are currently working upon, or on some topic connected with history of science and/or philosophy. Lectures 1-3 are devoted to the Ancient Greek and Roman Science Lectures 4-6 are devoted to Medieval and Renaissance Science Lectures 7-9 are devoted to the Scientific Revolution of the XVII century Lectures 10-12 are devoted to Science in the XVIII and XIX century Lectures 13-15 are devoted to Science in the XX-XXI centuries Lectures 16-18 are devoted to the Philosophy of Science

Philosophy of Science, Technology and Innovation (DG060026k)

Credits:6

This course will introduce students to the art of thinking critically and philosophically about the fundamental nature of technology, the fundamental nature of science, and the practical interplay of science and technology in the process of innovation. It will focus attention on understanding the differences between technology and science, and the direction of causality between them. Is technology really “applied science” (as is often presumed) or does science depend for its progress upon the prior development of technology? Historically, which tends to come first? The course will draw heavily upon a selection of critical literature in the modern scholarly field of the philosophy of technology, exposing students to the ideas of key thinkers who are shaping the field. The following questions will also be addressed: What is the relationship between technology and human society? Does technological change evolve autonomously along an inevitable trajectory of progress, or is it socially or politically determined? Does technology embody the culture and norms of the society in which it develops? Can technology be intrinsically “good” or intrinsically “bad,” or is technology morally neutral? Should engineers and scientists be held accountable in any way for the impact of their inventions on society and nature? Can the direction of technological change be consciously controlled by humans? What does it mean to “manage” technology? Who is responsible for dealing with the impact of new technology on society? Students will participate in a series of lectures and seminars, and study a set of scholarly readings, covering themes related to the above questions. Each student will write a paper investigating and analyzing a philosophical issue related to his or her own field of scientific or engineering research or interest.

Storytelling to Master Speech & Presentation Skills, 20 hours (I-01-19)

Credits:0.74

? What is a story? ? How to think like an audience ? Be able to build stories around their projects that audience can relate to easily and understand. ? Increase their confidence when speaking to audience. ? Be able to draft engaging speeches and presentations for various needs (Events, competitions, workplace, …) ? Learn the right techniques for voice tone, body movement and facial expressions. ? How to create slides that motivate the audience favorably to understand their ideas (Product, Project …) ? The right communication language & techniques to use when responding to audience questions. ? What content to include on the pitch deck (PowerPoint Slides) ? Deal with stress and anxiety prior and during various presentations types.

Storytelling to Master Speech & Presentation Skills, 20 hours (I-01-20)

Credits:0.74

What will students learn and receive: purpose, learning objectives, expected outcomes

 

 

 

- What is a story? What is Storytelling? - How to think like an audience - Be able to build stories around their projects, stories that audience can relate to easily and understand. - Increase their confidence when speaking to audience. - Be able to draft engaging speeches and presentations for various needs (Events, competitions, workplace, …) - Learn the right techniques for voice tone, body movement and facial expressions. - How to create slides that motivate the audience favorably to understand their ideas (Product, Project …) - The right communication language & techniques to use when responding to audience questions. - What content to include on the pitch deck (PowerPoint Slides) - Deal with stress and anxiety prior and during various presentations types.
Who can participate (pre-requisites / background if any) Anyone
   

Main theme

Topics covered

Introduction to Storytelling

What is Storytelling? Why Storytelling? What makes a great story? Tell stories that engage and influence audience Stories to avoid Building a personal story library

Body Language (gestures, posture, and facial expressions)

The importance of your Character The power of feelings, Emotions and passion How to think like an audience Deal with stress, fear and anxiety prior and during presentations.

Pitching

What is a pitch Start your presentation How to use a minute or two effectively The elevator pitch Deadly mistakes when pitching Handling Questions

Building engaging slides

Starting point for PowerPoint presentations Dos and don’ts Reasons presentations fail Closing your presentation Test your PowerPoint presentation on people

Wrap up: Public speaking and storytelling & pitching

Students Presentations

Privacy and Data Protection (for Non-Lawyers), 11 hours (I-02-19)

Credits:0.41

The main goal is to give students an idea how privacy and personal data protection regulations work in the modern age. Activity will cover (on very high level) 4 main topics: (1) privacy; (2) personal data protection; (3) big user data; (4) private sphere as limit of law. These four concepts describe the interaction between data subjects (individuals) and data processors (entities using the data about individuals for their needs) as a legal matter. During the activity the role of law as a social regulator will be discussed, along with possible legal instruments and factors (technologies, business and social models) increasing and decreasing their efficiency. As the activity is for non-lawyers, it will offer views on the legal matter both from inside (positivistic view, threating privacy and data protection laws as 'Ding an sich') and from outside (economic analysis of privacy; privacy risk management; privacy by design)

Bioethics Questions: Secret Organ Harvesting and Artificial Insemination, 7 hours (I-02-20)

Credits:0.26

Students will learn: (1) that under the Russian law it is ethical to remove organs from corps in secret from donors and their relatives;
(2) that under the Russian law il is ethical to prohibit artificial insemination to wives of prisoners: (3) how ethics of routine medical
treatments are challenged by people in Russian courts and the European Court of Human Rights; (4) what are the foreign and
international standards of organ harvesting for transplantation and allowing prisoners to procreate; (5) could the international law and litigation help to introduce ethical rules to the medicine; (6) what does it take to litigate court cases to introduce new ethical rules; (7)
why medics are reluctnt to participate as experts on the side of the litigants, (8) what is "strategic litigation" and (9) where to find more materials for self-education.

Students will learn and compare Russian, foreign and international ethic standards of organ removal for transplantation and
artificial insemination. Students will learn whether law is a panacea for unethical standards of medical practice. Students will
learn a new type of "lawyers" who work in public interest and do it for free (pro bono). After the class students will have a
choice of following ex isting ethical standards or proposed new ones. The course can help co shape skills of creative, critical and
ethical thinking going beyond medical sphere. Students can see and understand interrelation of medicine and law.

Waves, 12 hours (I-03-19)

Credits:0.44

Semi-popular course devoted to light, sound and water waves. After attending the course, you shall be able to answer simple questions like: Why we often see periodic water waves and rarely hear a pure note? Why waves come parallel to the shore no matter the wind direction? Why it is difficult to hear shouting against the wind? What feels a pilot passing the sound barrier? How road police catches speeders? More technically, you will know the basics like linear notions of phase and group velocity, caustics and nonlinear effects of shock creation, harmonics generation, wave instabilities and solitons.

Languages of the World: Understanding Them by Solving Linguistic Problems, 29 hours (I-03-20)

Credits:1.07

The idea of the course is to demonstrate the diversity of the world’s languages, so different and at the same time so alike, by solving self-sufficient problems featuring these languages. All problems can be solved without prior knowledge of any language except some English. When discussing the solutions we will be enjoying the various ways in which languages work. Students will expand their view on languages, learn some basic concepts of linguistics and improve their problem-solving skills and logical reasoning.

Main theme

Topics covered

Writing systems

pictograms, hieroglyphs, syllabaries, alphabets

Cognate languages

lexical statistics, language families, regular sound correspondences

Sounds

frequent and rare sounds, sound changes, tones

Word parts and word forms

languages with very short words and very long words, prefixes, suffixes and more weirder affixes, word parts (mis)understood by computers

Phrases and sentences

word order and its meaning: I love you, you love I, love you I, love I you…

Words and their meanings

lexical meaning, grammatical meaning, interaction between them, how languages categorize the world: colours, families, space, time…

Introduction to Information and Cyber Security Policy and Operations, 20 hours (I-04-19)

Credits:0.74

Cyber attacks are an increasingly common occurrence, making cybersecurity a growing challenge for all. The many forms of cyber-threats - spanning from data theft to surveillance and system compromise - have become tools of activism, corporate espionage and intelligence gathering. This seminar-style ISP course provides an introduction to the general challenges of cybersecurity and provides students with the skills to defend their organisation, scientific developments and personal computers from the most common forms of attack. At the conclusion of the course, students will: (1) Demonstrate a practical understanding of the organisational, policy and security contexts in which cybersecurity is important; (2) Understand the historical, strategic and normative context that cybersecurity draws upon; (3) Describe cyber security attack methodologies and relevant approaches to protective cyber security; (4) Outline effective cyber environments for protecting one's scientific developments or organisation; and (5) Evaluate cyber readiness of organisational and personal computing facilities

Privacy and Data Protection, 16 hours (I-04-20)

Credits:0.59

The main goal is to give students an idea how privacy and personal data protection regulations work in the modern age. Activity will cover (on very high level) 4 main topics: (1) privacy; (2) personal data protection; (3) big user data; (4) private sphere as limit of law. These four concepts describe the interaction between data subjects (individuals) and data processors (entities using the data about individuals for their needs) as a legal matter. During the activity the role of law as a social regulator will be discussed, along with possible legal instruments and factors (technologies, business and social models) increasing and decreasing their efficiency. As the activity is for non-lawyers, it will offer views on the legal matter both from inside (positivistic view, threating privacy and data protection laws as 'Ding an sich') and from outside (economic analysis of privacy; privacy risk management; privacy by design).

Main theme

Topics covered

Privacy

History of privacy. Celebrity rights. Modern privacy laws in US and Europe.

Data protection

Data protection regulations in EU and Russia

Privacy and big data

Big user data. Contextual privacy

Privacy as the limit of the law

Privacy and digital ecosystems. Extraterritorrial application of privacy laws.

 

Internal Information Security for Future Managers, 34 hours (I-05-19)

Credits:1.26

In a Digital Economy, all business processes are nothing more than transactions within applications. The users of these applications, especially the managers, are expected to know the basic and advanced rules of secure use of information systems. This course will demonstrate the theory and practice of secure use of information systems with all types of user activities, while avoiding the main internal information security risks. These include: user errors, insider activity, internal fraud, developer backdoors, and others. The course will show the modern methods of enforcing secure employee behaviour, as well as the ways to build the necessary behaviour patterns, both in theory and case studies. After this course, the students are expected to understand the main types of confidential information, the main information security risks within a company, and the methods for combatting them, both technical and psychological.

Waves, 12 hours (I-05-20)

Credits:0.44

Semi-popular course devoted to light, sound and water waves. After attending the course, you shall be able to answer simple questions like: Why we often see periodic water waves and rarely hear a pure note?
Why waves come parallel to the shore no matter the wind direction?
Why it is difficult to hear shouting against the wind?
What feels a pilot passing the sound barrier?
How road police catches speeders?
More technically, you will know the basics like linear notions of phase and group velocity, caustics and nonlinear effects of shock creation, harmonics generation, wave instabilities and solitons.

Main theme

Topics covered

Light and sound

Waves propagating with constant speed. Max cone. Doppler effect.

Water waves

Wave dispersion. Phase and group velocities. Caustics. Ship-generated wave pattern.

Nonlinear waves

Shocks. Black and white holes in a kitchen sink. Harmonics generation, instabilities. Solitons.

From Idea to Startup, 40 hours (I-06-19)

Credits:1.48

The "From Idea to Start-Up" course goal is to promote an entrepreneurial mindset for engineering students and give them tools to identify opportunities, understand market forces, and successfully commercialize new technologies. These important skills can better prepare them to enter the workforce and thrive in this ever-changing global economy. These skills are just as relevant for success in established enterprises as they are in startups. This course goes beyond the theory of developing a business by providing a real-world application. In addition, understanding the innovation ecosystem is essential at the present time where the discourse of innovation is widespread and innovation is high on the agenda within any organization, be it private or public, local or global. Among other things, the course aims to provide practical tools to enhance innovation that students will be able to implement in their work environment. The goal of the course is to develop, through close academic guidance, the skills and tools needed to establish a new hi-tech venture. No matter the participants background, all students gain valuable insight into what it takes to turn an idea into a real, scalable business through marketing, public speaking, flexibility, teamwork, current business trends, and more. The students will strengthen important skills such as identifying, defining, and characterizing problems, conducting market research, formulating strategies, etc. The course will include lectures and individual guidance sessions. Students will be required to submit papers relating to technological ideas that they will come up with.

Keys to Successful Leadership and Entrepreneurship,16 hours (I-06-20)

Credits:0.59

Purpose: understand the key factors that lead to success in different areas of professional life and practice the key skills.

Learning objectives: understand the link between personal strategy and corporate strategy, understand how to use two main instruments of constant development; learn how to read business books with maximum efficiency; learn how to create breakthrough strategies, how to maintain the motivation during long-term periods of time, understand the main principles of personal efficiency, understand the role of EQ and AQ in modern entrepreneurs.

Expected outcomes: 1. Development of students' skills in self-management, self-development and leadership 2. Practical experience of strategy creation (personal and business); 3. Understanding the role of networking in building modern businesses and practical hints and tips.

Main theme

Topics covered

Personal and professional success

What is a success in business and in personal life. what is a personal strategy? how to build it? Key factors to consider? Roadmap to your destination. Start with Why.

Two main instruments of constant development

Reading. How to maximize your efficiency? What is the connection between success and reading? What unites the most successful people?

Two main instruments of constant development (cont'd)

Networking. The role of networking and social environment in one's personal and professional development. How to create connections? Mentoring vs coaching vs tutoring. How to find your mentor? Engaging the mentor.

Soft skills essential to success

AQ - the new super important instrument of success. EQ. Communication skills - potential conflicts, working with manipulations, team building, synergies.

Science in Contemporary Art, 35 hours (I-07-19)

Credits:1.48

Students will expand their knowledge of Contemporary Art linked to science and engineering, as well as work on projects in groups and individually to foster their own creativity. Students will practice critical thinking, presentation skills, and team-building skills. Students will study global collaborations between specialists of the arts and sciences, and the engineering community to provide the exchange of ideas to stimulate innovative ideas in the science community and the creation of scientific and artistic projects. By the end of the course, students will have a basic knowledge of the main themes in contemporary art and will be able to examine their scientific work from artistic and cultural perspectives.

Science Communication Crash Course, 13 hours (I-07-20)

Credits:0.48

Purpose of this course is to provide students with the basic skills of science communication in a variety of settings and using variety of platforms. Students will learn general rules for creating and delivering good presentation, how to give talks at conferences, how to give public talks, how to make science posters, how to deal with stage fear. Students will learn how to communicate science in few minutes, using video, using online tools and social networks, and learn examples about some progressive ways of science communication through art and games. As a part of this course students will be assigned a project - to communicate scientific topic of their choice by using any of the approaches presented.

Main theme

Topics covered

Importance of Science Communication

Course motivation and impact of science communication.

How to Give a Good Presentation: General Tips

General rules that can be applied to a variety of settings.

Communicating Science to the General Public

Different methods will be covered from public talks, over short 3 min science, to videos, games, exhibits etc.

Communicating Science at Conferences

Tips for giving a good talk, writing conference abstract, making a poster.

Stage Fear

Issues of stage fear and nervousness as well as dealing with audience questions will be discussed.

Student Presentations and Feedback

Students will present their chosen topic using a chosen method of science communication and will be given feedback

Modernism in Literature of the 20th Century, 20 hours (I-08-19)

Credits:0.74

Modernism is both a group of different literary movements that existed between the 1880s -1950s and oeuvre of individual novelists, poets and drama writers. The ISP Activity «Modernism in Literature of the 20th century» is a course of lectures and seminars focused on history, aesthetics, and poetics of modernism and works of main modernist writers Franz Kafka, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, and T.S. Eliot. The purpose of the ISP activity is to encourage students to move beyond their main professional fields, develop their analytic skills and give them an opportunity for cultural and professional growth. Modernism is related to ???????the culture and science of the 20th. Ideas and theories by Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Niels Bohr changed the worldview of modernist writers and transformed the ???????aesthetic of their works. Participation in ISP Activity «Modernism in Literature of the 20th century» gives students the opportunity for cultural and professional growth. They can see the complexity and interrelation of all elements of culture and science and understand the subject of their research from a new point of view. For participants of ISP Activity «Modernism in Literature of the 20th century» will provide an opportunity to get to know the methodology of academic literary studies. The lecture course can help to develop the ability to navigate in scientific literature devoted to contemporary culture. Complexity and polysemy of modernist literature can help to shape the skills of critical thinking. Students can see and understand intercultural relations in the field of literature, art, and science.

Agile Way of Working and Innovative Product Development, 21 hours (I-08-20)

Credits:0.78

Agile isn’t just about managing SW projects with Scrum or Kanban. Established companies as well as startups and individual professionals in all industries are reaping benefits from agile culture and skills, product innovation, agile models of execution and business agility as enablers for digital transformation. The purpose of this course is help engineering student (both in SW and other domains) to explore and learn how to “be agile” and “do agile”. These important agile skills enable them to enter the workforce and thrive with both efficiency and creativity. The course goes beyond the theory and focuses on the application in real-world environments and scenarios. Students walk away with practical techniques and tools to implement the agile values and methods that are needed. In addition, the course lets students specifically explore how to apply innovative product development principles, frameworks and techniques (e.g. Scrum and Kanban) in their projects in SW as well as other areas.

Main Theme

Topics covered

Agile Culture and Organization

• Agile as a mindset •Intrinsic motivation and employee engagement • Agile organization models • Governance, autonomy, and alignment

Agile Life Cycle Models

• Scrum overview and flow • User stories and backlogs • Backlog management • Grooming and story elaboration

Agile Product Innovation

• Setting themes and epics • Design thinking combined with agile • Product experience (PX)

Agile Planning and Execution

• Sprints • Sprint planning • Execution and delivery • Kanban for specific usages

Agile Way of Working

• Customer centricity and value delivery • Servant leadership & coaching • Retrospectives for continuous improvement • Remote working and team collaboration

Existentialism and Literature of the 20th Century: Sartre, Camus, Golding, Fowles, Salinger, 20hours (I-09-19)

Credits:0.74

Existentialism is the most important phenomenon of philosophy and literature of the 20th century. The ISP Activity "Existentialism and Literature of the 20th century: Sartre, Camus, Golding, Fowles, Salinger" is a course of lectures and seminars focused on works of main existentialist philosophers and writers: Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, William Golding, John Fowles, and Jerome David Salinger. The purpose of the ISP activity is to encourage students to move beyond their main professional fields, develop their analytic skills and give them an opportunity for cultural and professional growth. Existentialism is related to the history, culture, and literature of the 20th century. Participation in ISP Activity "Existentialism and Literature of the 20th century” gives students the opportunity for cultural and professional growth. They can see the complexity and interrelation of all elements of history, culture philosophy, and literature and understand the subject of their research from a new point of view. For participants of ISP Activity “Existentialism and Literature of the 20th century: Sartre, Camus, Golding, Fowles, Salinger” will provide an opportunity to get to know the methodology of academic literary studies. The lecture course can help to develop the ability to navigate in scientific literature devoted to contemporary culture.

From Idea to Startup, 43 hours (I-09-20)

Credits:1.59

The "From Idea to Start-Up" course goal is to promote an entrepreneurial mindset for engineering students and give them tools to identify opportunities, understand market forces, and successfully commercialize new technologies. These important skills can better prepare them to enter the workforce and thrive in this ever-changing global economy. These skills are just as relevant for success in established enterprises as they are in startups. This course goes beyond the theory of developing a business by providing a real-world application. In addition, understanding the innovation ecosystem is essential at present where the discourse of innovation is widespread and innovation is high on the agenda within any organization, be it private or public, local or global. Among other things, the course aims to provide practical tools to enhance innovation that students will be able to implement in their work environment. The goal of the course is to develop, through close academic guidance, the skills, and tools needed to establish a new hi-tech venture. No matter the participants' background, all students gain valuable insight into what it takes to turn an idea into a real, scalable business through marketing, public speaking, flexibility, teamwork, current business trends, and more. The students will strengthen important skills such as identifying, defining and characterizing problems, conducting market research, formulating strategies, etc. Why is this activity interesting and useful: Many ideas and tech ventures never reach their full business potential. The reasons often include a lack of practical knowledge and the managerial tools required in the preliminary stages for the transformation of innovation into a business venture. The course focuses on the preliminary phases of venture development. The course will include lectures and individual guidance sessions. Students will be required to submit papers relating to technological ideas that they will come up with.

Main Theme

Topics covered

Introduction

• Introduction - Technological entrepreneurship • Innovation eco-systems & the Startup Nation • Idea creation (a conceptual hackathon) o How to find and assess Ideas o Idea validation

The startup life-cycle

Short Hackathon & teams work • The startup life-cycle • Team formation

Market research

• Market research (Customer Analysis, Competition, Complementary Technologies, and Trends (Threats & Opportunities), etc. • Milestones and critical decisions – activities for increasing company value

R&D plan

• R&D plan • Key activities and Timelines • Planning and Prioritization

Strategic planning

• Strategic planning (business models, go-to-market strategy etc.) • Financial plan workshop • The business plan of a start-up company • Examining technology and market feasibility • Principles of presenting to investors • IP

Financials

Financial planning and Financial Model

Business Storytelling

Business Storyteling and projects presentations preparations

Final presentations

Final presentations of the projects

Science Communication Crash Course, 14 hours (I-10-19)

Credits:0.52

Tijana is the main instructor, I am co-instructor The Information and digital age have erased boundaries in science and increased the rate by which science is performed and is published. The nature of research has also changed – it is more interdisciplinary, more technologically and society oriented but also more competitive and fast. Communicating ideas and research well has become the essence of successful science marketing. Moreover science communication has become a survival tool for every scientist whether trying to attract funding or promote his/her work. Crash course in science communication is a a combination of lectures and practical work. Students will learn how to: Make a good presentation for the right occasion (public lecture, science lecture or pitch) Communicate science to general public in short lectures Communicate science in media (TV, radio, newspapers) Communicate science through online media. Use other formats of science communication (art, tours, memes etc.) Dr. Tijana Prodanovic is Full Professor at Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad. She holds Doctor of Philosophy degree in astrophysics from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. 1. The winner of national FameLab contest in 2008 for the best young science communicator, and first runner up at the International FameLab contest 2008 held at Cheltenham Science Festival in Great Britain. 2. Speaker at the TEDxYouth@ISB event held in Belgrade in 2011. and TEDx Karlovacka Gimnazija held in 2016. 3. Author of a paper titled “Ten Commandments for Presentations“, published at Communicating Astronomy with the Public Journal (2009), 9, 19. ... Completed a number of international masterclass trainings in presentation and science communication skills and organized even more of them for researchers and University lecturers all over Europe Tijana's CV is available here: http://people.df.uns.ac.rs/~prodanvc/Tijana%20Prodanovic_CV_eng_v2.pdf

Science in Contemporary Art, 20 hours (I-10-20)

Credits:0.74

Students will expand their knowledge of Contemporary Art linked to science and engineering, as well as work on projects in groups and individually to foster their own creativity. Students will practice critical thinking, presentation skills, and team-building skills. Students will study global collaborations between specialists of the arts and sciences, and the engineering community to provide the exchange of ideas to stimulate innovative ideas in the science community and the creation of scientific c and artistic projects. By the end of the course, students will have a basic knowledge of the main themes in contemporary art and will be able to examine their scientific work from artistic and cultural perspectives.

Main theme

Topics covered

Science in Contemporary Art

These sessions will provide contemporary art history classes tailored for scientists and engineers with a concentration on contemporary art history, innovative ideas in the arts, and arts and sciences collaboration. Each session will be divided into a theoretical part and a practical studio/lab time. The theoretical part of the activity will be spent on studying and discussing contemporary art history and artistic practices that involve art and science projects. Lab time for these sessions is designed to provide students with the opportunity to create artworks based on the knowledge received in the course and their own professional expertise.

Introduction to General Management & Strategy, 12 hours (I-11-19)

Credits:0.44

This course focuses on how General Managers and CEOs design and implement strategies to sustain and enhance business performance, examining issues central to the long- and short-term competitive position of the firms they lead. As a field, Strategic Management attempts to explain why and how some firms outperform others in the market place, developing competitive advantage and sustaining it over time. Strategy involves making choices to use your resources in order to achieve your goal. This implies in most instances commitments that are difficult to revert. As such, it is crucial for organizations and their executives to develop a strategic mindset that help them to understand their strategic options and the consequences of their decisions for the future of the organization. The course provides a set of frameworks and analytical tools that enable you to understand and plan effective strategies for companies competing in a range of industries.

Critical Dialogues on Arts and Science, 10 hours (I-11-20)

Credits:0.37

The lectures and discussions with prominent practicing artists and scientists whose work examines the future of our culture shaped by the advancement of technologies. All of the participants are artists, researchers, and educators that work on ambitious and visionary projects presented in American and international institutions, museums, and galleries. Each session will include a lecture, a discussion, and answers to questions from Skoltech students. All students taking this class to fulfill the ISP requirements are expected to be present at all of the lectures and ask questions to the presenting artist during the talk.

Curated and moderated by Stass Shpanin, Assistant Teaching Professor at Rutgers University

List of participants:

  • Monday, January 18

Orkan Telhan, Associate Professor at University of Pennsylvania

  • Tuesday, January 19

Timothy Rusterholz, Assistant Professor of Instruction at Temple University

  • Wednesday, January 20

Victoria Vesna, Professor at University of California, Los Angeles

  • Thursday, January 21

Michael Rees, Professor at William Paterson University

  • Friday, January 22

Mark Dion, Visual Arts Mentor at Columbia University

 

Negotiation Games, 28 hours (I-12-19)

Credits:1.04

Students will learn the broad range of people management, influence, and negotiation skills taught in the form of interactive class games. We will play canonical games, including, but not limited by: 1) Keynesian beauty contest, 2) positional bargaining, 3) ultimatum game, 4) oil game, 5) beer game, 6) group win-win (both inquisitive and casted), 7) blind win-win, 8) assymetric group bargaining. This course replicates and expands the world-famous Wharton Negotiation Boothcamp. Excitement is guaranteed, learning is hard to avoid. Please note that this course is light on homework, but hard on attendance. Your participation in the class activities is your core learning and it is also the core tool of your classmates learning. Even 1 hour of class absence is betrayal of both yourself and your classmates and will lead to fail grade. Please expect be in class 10am to 7pm for three days with reasonable breaks.

Four Metaphors for the Enlightenment, 18 hours (I-12-20)

Credits:0.67

In recent times, the word Enlightenment, its equivalents in other languages and their derivatives have been widely used (providing names for prestigious book prizes, scholarships and scientific awards). And indeed, it is in the Age of Enlightenment that our present understanding of the world, as well as scientific, industrial and technological trends, are rooted (including those pursued at Skoltech). However, we rarely look back at the period itself. The main goal of this brief survey is to introduce people outside the humanities to the exciting world of the age, also known as the “long eighteenth century”— its interests, its passions, its obsessions. Why was Newton’s “Optics” so important for British poetry of the 1730s-1740s? What do we understand by “Social Newtonianism” and why was it abolished by the French Revolution? How did French mathematician and man of letters Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle set the course for European literature for the following century with his “Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds” and how did this text fare in Russia? How do various machines and automatons enter the art and culture of the period? What was the “Lunar Society of Birmingham,” counting among its ranks James Watt, Josiah Wedgwood, Joseph Priestley and other eminent British scientists, engineers and manufacturers? How did they interact with the Russian court under Catherine the Great, and where do we find traces of these exchanges today? How did Erasmus Darwin, the grandfather of Charles, manage to fit all the inventions and discoveries of his fellow “lunartics” into his long didactic poem “Botanic Garden” (1789), which first appeared in Russian translation only a year ago, in 2016? When and why do optical devices, such as the camera obscura and magic lantern, become images of “human understanding” and human history, correspondingly? These are just a few of the questions that will be addressed in the course.

Main theme

Topics covered

Age of Enlightenment in the History of Ideas. Theater of Nature

1) Intro to the Concept of Enlightenment. Terms, Concepts, main ideas. Why this period is so important today, how it resonates with our century. 2) The 18th-century embrace of Theatrum Naturae, a theatrical view of the natural world. Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle’s “Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds” (1686), Isaac Newton’s “Optics” (1704), and other texts, both scientific and literary, devised on both sides of the English Channel.

The Machine and Society

The world of machines, to which both human society as a whole and various political systems have been compared. Mechanistic layer of the eighteenth-century imagery and iconography, with a special focus on the machines discussed and represented in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and D’Alembert (1751-1772). Adam Smith and the machine metaphor.

Architecture and/as Language

18th-century theories of Language. Common architectural and Linguistic Concepts. "Speaking Architecture" of the French Enlightenment and some architectural ideas of Skolkovo.

The Magic Lantern and the Optics of History.

Optical Images and their Metaphoric Implications."Devices of Wonder". Camera Obscura and Magic Lantern as the two “hyper-images” of the Early and Late Enlightenment respectively, representing the human mind (camera obscura) and human history (magic lantern). Turn of the Century as a Phenomena. Some Conclusions.

EQ Hardcore, 28 hours (I-13-19)

Credits:1.04

Students will learn the broad range of Emotional Intelligence (EQ) skills taught in the form of interactive class games staged in an intensive mode producing hardcore experience. We will start from social and personal awareness, exercise in stress management, and culminate in influence. The fine line between influence, motivation, manipulation, and exploitation will be crossed several times under several angles and in different directions. We will play and do canonical group games and exercises, including, but not limited by: 1) Keynesian beauty contest, 2) passive browsing, 3) preaching to statue, 4) goals and values prioritization, 5) glasswalking (WARNING! It is real barefoot walking on real broken glass), 6) influence row and zhmurki (WARNING! It is more painful then glasswalking). This course replicates and expands the world-famous Stanford GSB “Interpersonal Dynamics” (aka “Touchy Feely”) class, one of the most famous and successful educational soft skills endeavors on the global scale. Excitement is guaranteed, learning is hard to avoid. Please note that this course is light on homework, but hard on attendance. Your participation in the class activities is your core learning and it is also the core tool of your classmates learning. Even 1 hour of class absence is betrayal of both yourself and your classmates and will lead to fail grade. Please expect be in class 10am to 7pm for three days with reasonable breaks. PLEASE NOTE THAT this ISP class strongly overlaps with the E&I course "Leadership for Innovators" hence you should not attend this ISP class if you wish to attend the E&I class.

Existentialism and Literature of the 20th century: Sartre, Camus, Golding, Fowles, Salinger,20 hours (I-13-20)

Credits:0.74

Existentialism is the most important phenomenon of philosophy and literature of the 20th century. The ISP Activity "Existentialism and Literature of the 20th century: Sartre, Camus, Golding, Fowles, Salinger" is a course of lectures and seminars focused on works of main existentialist philosophers and writers: Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, William Golding, John Fowles, and Jerome David Salinger. The purpose of the ISP activity is to encourage students to move beyond their main professional fields, develop their analytic skills, and give them an opportunity for cultural and professional growth. Existentialism is related to the history, culture, and literature of the 20th century. Participation in ISP Activity "Existentialism and Literature of the 20th century” gives students the opportunity for cultural and professional growth. They can see the complexity and interrelation of all elements of history, culture philosophy, and literature and understand the subject of their research from a new point of view. For participants of ISP Activity “Existentialism and Literature of the 20th century: Sartre, Camus, Golding, Fowles, Salinger” will provide an opportunity to get to know the methodology of academic literary studies. The lecture course can help to develop the ability to navigate in scientific literature devoted to contemporary culture.

Main theme

Topics covered

Lecture 1. Intro to Existentialism: history, main ideas, and representatives.

Brief history of existentialist philosophy. Basic ideas of existentialism. Existentialism and Literature of the 20th Century

Lecture 2. Philosophy and literature of Jean-Paul Sartre: Absurd, Freedom, Choice, Responsibility.

The significance of Jean-Paul Sartre in the context of world culture; a biography of Sartre; features of Sartre's worldview and his literary works, analysis of his philosophical work «Existentialism Is a Humanism» and the novel "The Nausea".

Seminar 1. Jean-Paul Sartre ‘s play «The Flies».

The analysis of Jean-Paul Sartre ‘s play «The Flies»: plot, characters, symbols, structure, narrative, meanings.

Lecture 3. Philosophy and Literature of Albert Camus.

The significance of Albert Camus in the context of world culture. The biography of Camus. The features Camus's philosophical worldview and his literary works, analysis of his essays “The Myth of Sisyphus” and novels “The Stranger (Outsider)” and “The Plague”.

Lecture 4. William Golding: Conception of Human Being and ?riticism of Existentialism.

The significance of William Golding in the context of The Second World War. The biography of Golding. The features of William Golding conception of human beings, aesthetics and poetics in his novels of the 1950-60s.

Seminar 2. The novel “The Lord of the Flies” by William Golding as a Existentialist Fable

The analysis of William Golding's novel «The Lord of the Flies»: plot, characters, symbols, structure, narrative, meanings.

Lecture 5. The oeuvre of John Fowles and Existentialist Philosophy.

The significance of John Fowles in the context of world literature; a biography of John Fowles; Existentialism and its influence on Fowles’s perception of being; features of Fowles worldview, aesthetics, and poetics.

Seminar 3. Freedom and Responsibility in the novel “French Lieutenant’s Woman” by John Fowles.

The analysis of John Fowles's novel “French Lieutenant’s Woman”: the embodiment of Fowles’s worldview, aesthetic and poetics in the plot, characters, symbols, structure and narrative of the novel.

Lecture 6. Existentialist ideas in the collection of short stories “Nine Stories” by J.D. Salinger.

The significance of J.D. Salinger's prose in the context of world literature; a biography of J.D. Salinger; analysis of the novel “The Catcher in the Rye” and short stories "A Perfect Day for Bananafish", "Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut", "Just Before the War with the Eskimos", "Teddy" by J.D. Salinger: narrative, characters, symbols, philosophy.

Essay defence.

Reading and discussion of essays.

Four Sprints to AI-Based Product, 30 hours (I-14-19)

Credits:1.11

“4 Sprints to AI-based Product” is an introduction to modern AI technologies with the special focus onto the opportunities and challenges for the practical application of these technologies in real industry and business world. Through team and project-based work students will learn hot topics related to (1) state-of-the-art technologies and approaches in the area of 2D-3D images ML; (2) what is the right way to build and evaluate ML model intended for practical industrial use case and business case; (3) team and project-based work with modern SW Engineering technical and project management practices. During the course you will get in-depth understanding of how to build frameworks such as listed in collections https://github.com/analysiscenter and https://github.com/gazprom-neft . Your final demo is to come with a tool of your own. In addition, the course will bridge students to potential host organizations for 2020 summer industry immersion (e.g. AI department of Gazpromneft which is the course partner).

European and American Literature of the 20th century, 20 hours (I-14-20)

Credits:0.74

European and American Literature of the 20th century is related to the culture and science of this historical period. The catastrophe of the First World War, ideas and theories by Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Niels Bohr changed the worldview of writers and transformed the aesthetic of their works. Participation in ISP Activity «European and American Literature of the 20th century» gives students the opportunity for cultural and professional growth. They can see the complexity and interrelation of all elements of European and American culture, history, and science and understand the subject of their research from a new point of view. For participants of ISP Activity «European and American Literature of the 20th century» will provide an opportunity to get to know the methodology of academic literary studies. The lecture course can help to develop the ability to navigate in scientific literature devoted to contemporary culture. Complexity and polysemy of modernist and realist literature of Europe and the USA can help to shape the skills of critical thinking. Students can see and understand intercultural relations in the field of literature, art, and science.

Main theme

Topics covered

Lecture 1. Comparative History of European and American Literature, and Literary Development in the 20th Century.

Comparative history of European and American Literature: similarities and interconnections. The catastrophe of the First World War and Literature of the 20th century. The difference between Modernism and Realism. The different perceptions of Being in novels, poems, and dramas of the 20th century. Modernism, Realism and the literature of other centuries, aesthetic features of Modernism and Realism.

Lecture 2. Artistic World of Franz Kafka.

The significance of Franz Kafka in the context of world literature; a biography of Kafka; features of Kafka's worldview and his poetics, analysis of his novel "The Trial".

Seminar 1. Franz Kafka's short story "The Metamorphosis".

The analysis of Franz Kafka's short story "The Metamorphosis": plot, characters, symbols, structure, narrative, meanings.

Lecture 3. The novel "Ulysses" by James Joyce: myth and narrative experiments.

The significance of James Joyce in the context of world literature; a biography of James Joyce; features of James Joyce worldview, aesthetics, and poetics in his early works "The Dubliners", "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man". "Ulysses" by James Joyce: myth, narrative experiments, plot, characters, symbols, structure, meanings.

Seminar 2 Virginia Woolf: Perception of Being and Aesthetic.

The significance of Virginia Woolf in the context of world literature; a biography of Woolf; Bloomsbury Group; features of Virginia Woolf worldview, aesthetics, and poetics. The analysis of Virginia Woolf's novel "Mrs. Dalloway": the embodiment of Woolf's worldview, aesthetic and poetics in the plot, characters, symbols, structure, and narrative of the novel.

Lecture 5. Ernest Hemingway’s prose: narrative and ideas.

The significance of Ernest Hemingway in the context of world literature; a biography of Ernest Hemingway; The First World War and Hemingway's fiction; features of Hemingway's worldview, aesthetics, and poetics.

Seminar 3. Estrangement and Hope in Ernest Hemingway's short story "The Cat in the Rain".

The analysis of Ernest Hemingway's novel "The Cat in the Rain": the embodiment of Hemingway's worldview, aesthetic, and poetics in the plot, characters, symbols, structure, and narrative of the story.

Lecture 6. The Epic Theatre of Bertolt Brecht.

The significance of Bertolt Brecht's theory in the context of world literature; a biography of Bertolt Brecht; literary criticism and theatrical theory of Bertolt Brecht; analysis of the play "Mother Courage and Her Children" by Brecht.

Lecture 7. Plastic Theater and «A Streetcar Named Desire» by Tennessee Williams

Tennessee Williams and theory of Plastic Theater in the context of world literature; a biography of Williams; analysis of the play " A Streetcar Named Desire " by Williams.

Presentation and discussion of essays based on the content of the course.

Reading and discussion of essays

Practical Aspects of Parametric Optimization, 15 hours (I-15-19)

Credits:0.56

Parametric optimization has a wide range of applications in almost any domain and at any stage of the design and production. During this course we will discuss typical scenarios, suitable methods and approaches and their strength and limitations, illustrated both with real industrial use cases and simple models. Theoretical part will include the basics of parametric optimization, introduction to mathematical methods, overview of most popular algorithms for single and multi-objective optimization and their applicability to different types of problems. Main attention will be paid to the typical issues we face solving real tasks, such as high dimensionality, noise in the responses, severely constrained and il-posed problems and multi-modal response behavior. Practical part will have a form of the hands-on sessions, where you will be able to play with toy examples illustrating the issues listed above and test different methods and tricks to resolve them. Course will include 4 theoretical lectures and 4 practical sessions.

Introduction to Branding, 15 hours (I-15-20)

Credits:0.56

This introductory course helps students to learn the basics of branding in a marketing, business and entrepreneurial environments. These are key elements to develop brand notoriety and customer loyalty, and for successful commercialization of products and services. In terms of content, the course provides a basic understanding and a general overview of what a brand is and why it matters, how a brand creates value, and the role of brand positioning in competitive markets. Through the course, students will analyze world's most famous brands and learn some basic insights on how to define a customer-centric brand that could offer a compelling message to prospective customers.

Main Theme

Topics covered

The Concept & Scope of Branding

Brand story. Brand value elements. Brand hierarchy.

Innovation Project: Tech for Good, 40 hours (I-16-19)

Credits:1.48

The course is planned as combination of theoretical and hands-on activities. It is practice-oriented course with much of the time spent on shaping technology-based opportunities driven by social responsibility idea. A central objective of this crash course is to help students develop the ability to find, evaluate, and develop technological ideas into commercially viable and socially responsible product concepts, and communicate those concepts into viable business propositions. Students will propose ideas, technology and user driven, check their hypothesis with users and work on developing the most promising into parts of a location based mobile application that encourages people to do good for their local community. Learning outcomes: • Understanding the concept of social responsibility and Sustainability Development Goals (Agenda 2030 of the United Nations) • Understand the importance of social responsibility and its impact on business development, especially how it shapes innovative ideas. • Understand how to translate user needs and wants into considerations of design, use and application. • Ability to use engineering, scientific and creative problem solving tools and methods, to assess and design an opportunity in the form of product / service. • Ability to forge technology-based ideas into workable business concepts and learn how to test them in the marketplace. • Ability to shape and present ideas in the different oral and written forms, depending on occasion and audience • Ability to work in groups.

New Space Startup Bootcamp, 30 hours (I-16-20)

Credits:1.11

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the New Space sector, to critically analyze New Space ventures for business and financial viability, and to learn how to integrate knowledge from non-space technical fields with data coming from space assets in order to create new product and service offerings. Learning objectives At the end of the course the learners will: Learn what is New Space and how it differs from traditional space activities. Learn how to integrate their non space knowledge with space knowledge to define new solutions with market potential. Reverse engineer New Space ventures to analyze their business model. Define the business model of a New Space venture idea. Expected outcomes At the end of the course, the students will have defined, analyzed and pitched a New Space startup idea from end to end, including market, product, business model, distribution channels, competition, risks, financial model. New Space startup ideas will either be formulated by the students or brought to the class by the teaching staff.

Main Theme

Topics covered

Introduction to the New Space sector

Definition of New Space Space economy overview Space industry verticals: upstream and downstream

New Space business models

New Space business models Scalability and financial sustainability considerations for New Space startups

Shape a New Space venture idea

Shaping a New Space venture idea Validating the business model Pitching the idea

Validate a New Space venture idea

Customer discovery Pitching for fundraising Iterative project development

Extracting Value from Data: McKinsey Challenge, 20 hours (I-17-19)

Credits:0.74

Companies have historically managed assets such as property, plants, equipment, inventory, cash, and intellectual property. In today’s digital world, a new type of asset is emerging – data. Companies are reporting, collecting, and analyzing vast volumes of data. Data is becoming a key measure of whether a company will remain relevant through the digital revolution. And, the key challenge is being able to extract value from data. Thus, understanding and practicing how to extract value from data is one of the most important new knowledge domains. In this ISP course, I partner with McKinsey Russia to teach students exactly this. The course will be delivered as a hackathon (business case + some coding) supported (lecture, mentoring, assessment) by experts from McKinsey Russia. Learning outcomes: • Understanding the concept of digital transformation • Understand the value of data for businesses • Ability to use engineering, scientific and creative problem solving tools and methods, to extract value from data. • Ability to shape and present ideas in the different oral and written forms, depending on occasion and audience • Ability to work in groups.

Critical and Creative Thinking Workshop, 24 hours (I-17-20)

Credits:0.89

Students will learn how to use critical and creative thinking purposefully, and respond meaningfully to the ever-changing study and work environment. In this course, students will practice using critical and creative thinking to generate and evaluate knowledge, clarify concepts and ideas, seek possibilities, consider alternatives and solve problems. Critical and creative thinking is an in-demand professional and personal skillset that is especially essential for innovating. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the processes and approaches involved in critical and creative thinking. When used together, they will benefit and enrich students' problem-solving and decision-making abilities in personal and study/workplace situations.

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

• describe what is meant by creative thinking and enhance their ability to develop skills in effective originality

• describe what is meant by critical thinking and enhance their ability to develop arguments, use evidence in support of those arguments, draw reasoned conclusions, and use information to solve problems

• combine approaches from both critical and creative thinking skills to decision-making and problem-solving processes.

Main Theme

Topics covered

Introduction to Critical and Creative Thinking.

Thinking about thinking: How we Think. - Problem-solving, decision-making and thinking skills - Cognitive biases that influence our decisions - Basic Definitions -Diferences between Critical and Creative Thinking

Critical Thinking Toolkit

Identification and practice of critical thinking strategies such as reflection, rationality, open mindedness, discipline and judgement. Basic tools for critical thinking about arguments: Claims, Arguments, Premises, Conclusions.

Tools for Reasoning

Thinking categorically: categorical logic. Deductive reasoning with claims.Common deductively valid forms. Equivalences. Rules of formal deduction with forms and equivalences.

Creativity and Art of Creative Thinking

Developing mental flexibility: know-hows and practice. Ways of finding creative inspiration. How to eliminate various creative blocks: tips and exercises.

Boosting Creative Thinking Skills

Identification and practice of creative thinking skills such as reflection, ideation, illustration, embracing mistakes and questioning Creative thinking challenges – deliberate practice using challenges that enable to think laterally and inventively and ultimately to develop original approaches in defining and solving problems.

Combining critical and creative thinking in problem-solving and decision-making

Problem-solving models and techniques. Decision-making: approaches, models, practices.

Express Academic Writing, 30 hours (I-18-19)

Credits:1.11

The ability to communicate ideas and report research findings in writing is one of the key factors of academic success. Academic writing in English is challenging for the non-native speakers who are expected to produce papers, reports, and dissertations acceptable for the international professional community. Contrary to popular belief, it is impossible to become a professional writer overnight. Moreover, there is no such thing as a “perfect first draft”. Writing is a skill, and its mastery requires a considerable investment of time and effort. The Course is designed to develop a conscious approach to academic writing through the analysis of authentic texts, intensive writing and editing practice. The ‘process-for-product’ approach takes the students through the whole writing cycle as they are learning to write a draft and use the reviewer's advice to edit, refine and polish it. The Course focuses on the specifics of the main parts of the research paper in terms of structure, vocabulary, grammar, and style. I can’t promise you a miracle; I can promise hard work and rewarding experience. And in the end, you will be much better equipped to write a research paper.

Ethics of AIML and Robotics in Digital Era, 16 hours (I-18-20)

Credits:0.59

The course is constructed as a series of discussions, relating to the actual ethical, social and psychological issues steaming out of artificial intelligence, machine learning and robotics development. Artificial intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML) and robotics are digital technologies that will have more and more significant impact on the development of humanity in the near future. These technologies raised fundamental questions about what we as humans should do with these systems, what the systems themselves should do, what risks they involve, and how we can/should control these such risks. The students will learn how to think about human implications of technologies. Via the discussions on drastic ethical issues in AIML and robotics, students will be introduced into the STS (Science, Technology and Society) thinking.

Main Theme

Topics covered

Moral and Legal Responsibility of AI, ML and Robots

Pros and Cons of: Autonomus Vehicles, Robots at Work: Production, Arts,Music, Programming.

Human-Robots Interactions.

Pros and Cons of the use of robots in: Health Care, Education, Home assistance.

Applications:From Love to War

Pros and Cons of: Lovotics: human-robot love and sex relationships; Military Robots; Internet of Things

The Future of AI,ML and Robotics and Human Development.

Pros and Cons of: Anthropomorphic Robots, Artificial Identity, Self-Learning Robots.

The Roots of Scientific English, 30 hours (I-19-19)

Credits:1.11

Course Components: - Derivation and basic meaning of English words from Latin and Greek elements - Morphology of vocabulary in the natural, earth, medical and physical sciences - Survey of scientific nomenclature, origins - Application by pointwise comprehension in scholarly literature Learning Outcomes: - Acquire a working vocabulary of the fundamental Greek and Latin roots, prefixes, and suffixes - Understand the historical processes leading to the development of current scientific terminology - Learn selected topics among word parsing, term clustering, malformations and linguistic implications of the Scientific Revolution - Understand the mechanisms of word formation and their impact on modern scientific and social English - Apply knowledge to scientific communication, viz., reading, creativity, presenting

Negotiation Games, 27 hours (I-19-20)

Credits:1

Students will learn the broad range of people management, in uence, and negotiation skills taught in the form of interactive class games. We will play canonical games, including, but not limited by: 1) Keynesian beauty contest, 2) positional bargaining, 3) ultimatum game, 4) oil game, 5) beer game, 6) group winwin (both inquisitive and casted), 7) blind win-win, 8) assymetric group bargaining. This course replicates and expands the world-famous Wharton Negotiation Boothcamp. Excitement is guaranteed, learning is hard to avoid. Please note that this course is light on homework, but hard on attendance. Your participation in the class activities is your core learning and it is also the core tool of your classmates learning. Even 1 hour of class absence is betrayal of both yourself and your classmates and will lead to fail grade. Please expect be in class 10am to 7pm for three days with reasonable breaks.

Introduction to Cybersecurity, 25 hours (I-20-19)

Credits:0.93

In the modern world, where information systems play one of the most significant roles, security becomes one of the biggest challenges that affects everyone and everything: from ordinary users of social networks to the largest companies and even governments. Therefore, understanding of main principles and challenges of modern cybersecurity becoming important competence of every technical specialist and necessary knowledge for every person who cares about his personal data. During this course, students will learn: -The key concepts, definitions and challenges of today’s cybersecurity -The concepts of most popular vulnerabilities in different protocols, -services and systems and how they can be exploited -Basics of Cryptography -Basics of Reverse Engineering -Common personal security tools

EQ Hardcore, 27 hours (I-20-20)

Credits:1

Students will learn the broad range of Emotional Intelligence (EQ) skills taught in the form of interactive class games. We will start from stress management, play with time management and culminate in influence and motivation (aka awareness). The fine line between influence, motivation, manipulation, and exploitation will be crossed several times under several angles and in different directions. We will play and do canonical group games and exercises, including, but not limited by: 1) Keynesian beauty contest, 2) passive browsing, 3) preaching to statue, 4) goals and values prioritization, 5) glasswalking (WARNING! It is real barefoot walking on real broken glass), 6) influence row (WARNING! It is more painful then glasswalking). This course replicates and expands the world-famous Stanford GSB "Interpersonal Dynamics" (aka "Touchy Feely") class, one of the most famous and successful educational endeavors on the global scale. Excitement is guaranteed, learning is hard to avoid. The most vicious and hardcore games are carefully handpicked to provide students with the most dramatic and hence efficient learning experience. Please note that this course is light on homework, but hard on attendance. Your participation in the class activities is your core learning and it is also the core tool of your classmates learning. Even 1 hour of class absence is betrayal of both yourself and your classmates and will lead to fail grade. Please expect be in class 10 to 18 for three days with reasonable breaks.

Science Communication, 28 hours (I-21-20)

Credits:1.04

Course goals: — Students can present and discuss a detailed view of science communication as a process of interaction between science and society, a means of creating the public perception of science and an instrument of science policy; — Students are equipped to continue building on the science communication skills they are introduced to in class on their own. Course learning outcomes: 1. Operational knowledge of the conceptual framework of science communication 2. A scientific approach to the practice (using the science of science communication) 3. A critical discussion of the current problems in science communication in their historical context 4. Solving ethics case studies in science communication 5. A critical discussion of the goals, roles and methods of various actors in science communication 6. Operating within various models of science communication 7. Defining the criteria for effective risk and uncertainty communication and communicating effectively 8. Defining the criteria for effective conflict communication and communicating issues around scientific conflicts effectively Full version of the draft course syllabus is available here https://drive.google.com/file/d/1bM9oxUwNThGvxahsP7xjCIbJEvug5pzA/view?usp=sharing

Create Your Own Biomachine: Preparing for Genetically Engineered Machines Contest (iGEM), 22 hours (I-22-19)

Credits:0.81

This course is aimed to establish the team which will represent Skoltech at iGEM competition in 2020. The International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition (iGEM) is one of the most honorable competitions in biology. Working over the summer, student teams from all over the world design their own biological systems using tools for genetical engineering. Preparation for the context usually begins in winter from discussing the ideas that could be performed and presented at the iGEM conference in October in Boston. During the ISP course, students will discuss projects from the previous iGEM competition from the perspective of the Skoltech fundamentals: Scientific basis of the project, its Technological abilities, and Entrepreneurial perspectives. There will be introductory lectures for non-bio people, so students with different backgrounds are highly welcomed. These lectures will cover essential topics: molecular biology, genetical engineering, and current trends in genome editing. During project discussions and networking activities, students will communicate and understand everybody’s strong and weak areas of expertise. By the end of the course, students will come up with their own ideas that could be presented on iGEM 2020. Moreover, this course is an excellent opportunity to find new friends! By the end of the course we aim to: - establish the team which will represent Skoltech at iGEM competition next year - come up with several cool ideas of projects that can be done for the contest

Roadmap to Career Success, 14 hours (I-22-20)

Credits:0.52

Purposes:
To show students how to define where they are and where they want to be in terms of job searching and career
To show students how important to start thinking about the career path now.

Learning objectives:
Career tracks overview
Steps to the first job Researching potential employers 
Tools for success: CV’s, difficult interviews, employment for foreigners, effective industrial immersion
Job searching and work in Russia

Expected outcomes:
Clear view of the tracks after graduation from
Skoltech Created Career
Objective for each participant
Soft skills training
Network with Skoltech Community

Main Theme

Topics covered

Why is it important to start now?

1. Course overview Speakers e-meeting Career Planning Importance

Sectors / Functions / Positions overview

Career field, organizational categories, functions, positions titles, career competencies, goals. Creating a Career Objective (homework)

Industrial immersion

Effective Industrial Immersion

Preparing for the next step

Practical knowledges about CV’s, difficult interviews, employment for foreigners, etc.

Soft skills and networking

Soft skills training and meeting with Skoltech graduate

Foundation in Digital 3D Sculpting | ART & DESIGN, 21 hours (I-23-19)

Credits:0.78

The Foundation in 3d digital Art & Design provides students the opportunity to value their interest and proficiency in the visual arts, while developing the fundamental skills that are essential building blocks to becoming a better artist and becoming better at expressing yourself. The result of the course will be a completed models for your portfolio. The last project will be printed on a 3d printer. Best gift for relatives and friends. Students will learn: 1. Program Interface and Navigation Tools 2. Sculpting tools and their settings 3. Modeling with ZSphere 4. Sculpting characters and environmental objects 5. Create and apply textures 6. Retopology grid, removing normal maps

How to Stop Worrying about Art and Start Enjoying It, 24 hours (I-23-20)

Credits:0.89

A crush-course about history of European art since Renaissance till Impressionism will introduce students into different social, religious and cultural practices that delineated the development of painting and the main modes of interaction with it. Students will learn how to look at a painting, where to look, what questions to ask and how to answer them. For many centuries art had been one of the main instrument of teaching people, preaching to them, moving them and soothing them. Understanding these functions helps to re-introduce art back into our lives. In short, after taking this course one shall never be bored by an art museum.

Main theme

Topics covered

Why did they do it?

Main functions of art in the Renaissance. Religious art for public or individual prayer. Who piad for it and why. different modes of reactions: art as a substitute of the Bible for the illiterate, art as a proxy of God, art as a tool for meditation.

Who are all these people?

Main subjects of religious art. Madonna and Child - the meaning of the subjects and the main details that make it special. Annunciation: four episodes in one. Nativity: lessons of poverty and serenity. Saint Joseph a step-father of Christ. Saint Anne -- Christ's grandmother. What is the baby-Christ doing on the picture and why does it matter.

OMG, what is he doing!

Sexuality of Christ - naked baby and the Man of Sorrows. Why Renaissance painters seem to be obsessed by Christ's s genitalia

Pin-up girls for aristocracy or powerful women?

Nudity in art^ from reclining Venus to Manet's "Olimpia". Renaissance belief in simultaneous orgasm as a prerequisite for procreation and its influence on art.

Who deserved a portrait?

Social functions of portraits and social status of the models. Ideal, heroic and true-to-life portraits. Gestures and signs of social rank and mood. Phyiiognomics or how to paint an invisible soul.

Power of Landscape

Landscape in religious painting. Types of landscape: pastoral, ideal, sublime. City landscapes. Signs of power in lansdcape.National landscape.

Africanomics 101, 20 hours (I-24-19)

Credits:0.74

This course will expose students to the broader scopes of African history, economics, culture and geopolitics. Students will learn how to perform Economic Target Assessment using tools such as Gynawali and Fogel’s key dimensions for nations toward entrepreneurship development. This course will expose students, who are potential SK Innovators (Future Venture Capitalists) to the Entrepreneurial Portends of the African Continent. Students will enjoy the richness and beauty of Africa through interaction with well informed and passionate African Instructors, a possible trip to an African Museum in Moscow, Souvenirs)

Project Lab: Building Skoltech1Million Entrepreneurial Challenge, 40 hours (I-24-20)

Credits:1.48

To support Skoltech’s core mission and drive its entrepreneurial development, we aim to frame, organize and execute Skoltech1Million, an annual students’ entrepreneurial competition. The overall goal of this short course is to invite students to co-create the project - its visual identity, website and frame competition rules. Students will run co-creation project and directly co-create (elements of) Skoltech1Million experience – including visual identity, branding and student centered services. By this course, we aim to increase flow of quality ideas and concepts into Skoltech1Million development pipeline. Involving students and other stakeholders should help in providing a consistent flow of ideas and concepts that Skoltech1Million can use for new initiatives and project development. Finally, this activity aims at building Skoltech community spirit!

Main Theme

Project intro

community co-creation: co-creating visual identity

community co-creation: co-creating project website

community co-creation: project rules

Project presentations

Team work

Charisma: From Basics to Public Speaking, 24 hours (I-25-19)

Credits:0.89

Show students the key approaches for developing social skills: - Focus on outside work (body language, voice, fillers) - Focus on inside work (changing habits, developing mindsets, overcoming fears) Students will be able to apply these frameworks for independent development. Story-telling - basics of story-telling - tips for making the story brighter - how to imply story-telling to self-presentation, to project presentation, to public speaking and etc. Public speaking: - How to deal with stress during a public speaking - How to keep the attention of the audience Students will be able to prepare a talk and manage stress during delivering it.

Softplay - Soft Skills for Engineers, 24 hours (I-26-19)

Credits:0.89

The purpose of the course is to improve the soft skills of students with engineering backgrounds based on the practical experience of real project implementation and show them direct implementation of those skills in the field. We help them to analyze possible difficulties of implementing their work and prepare for them. By means of the business game, we place students in a controlled environment in which they can not only practice their skills but also analyze and improve them. The expected outcomes are for students to practice in negotiating, to understand that different people may act unpredictably and irrationally and develop strategies to act in this situation. Also, it aims to develop their soft skills and look at themselves from different perspectives. The additional goal is to make students think what is the viewpoint of the person without an engineering background (customer or end-user) on the technology they are developing. The important topic to consider is fairness. Despite people understand this work naturally, it is crucial to know that various people consider different things fair and unfair.

ProfiRu Hackathon by HackLab, 40 hours (I-26-20)

Credits:1.48

Following the core idea of the HackLab, with this ISP course we aim to provoke, stimulate and motivate top-notch STEM students to actively use their creative potential and deep technical knowledge to generate innovative ideas challenged by concrete problems presented by business partners. And spiced up with flavor of competition between teams. By taking this ISP hands-on course, students will: • gain experience of problem solving under resource and time constraints; • understand concepts like user pain and persona, and to practice prototyping; • understand and touch real-life problems companies face; • understand why perfect is the enemy of good; and • master remote teamwork and have fun while solving problems. Task is to prevent banned fraudsters from coming back on Profi.ru platform. Teams will have to identify users by their typing characteristics - timing between letters, keyboard types and similar. The main challenge is to reach highest possible classification score (ROC-AUC) within serious computation restrictions (CPU, time, memory) using provided real-life dataset. Profi.ru is an online marketplace that allows users to find freelancers and professionals in various categories across Russia and several CIS countries.

Main Theme

Problem presentation and Q&A

Check Point 0

Check Point 1

Check Point 2

Final presentation

Closing

Team work

Design and Implementation of Human Activity Recognition in Robotics, 15 hours (I-27-19)

Credits:0.56

The course covers the basic concepts of HAR, including: data modalities (RGB/RGBD images, skeleton key points and other types) different approaches to the problem (classical CV, …, DL) notes on real-world applications (collision avoidance, action prediction) Also there will be given notes on the design of a handmade framework for Image Processing in robotics, currently being under active development. The key features of the framework are flexibility, simplicity and unification wherever possible.

Molecular and Mesoscale Simulations, 15 hours (I-27-20)

Credits:0.56

The objective is giving students a practical introduction to classical molecular simulation techniques or mastering a more specific skill of the student. The exact subject depends on the interest of the students. The topics may include (a) classical molecular dynamics (either writing students own primitive code or getting acquired with open-source general purpose codes) (b) Monte Carlo in different ensembles (c) coarse grained simulations (Brownian dynamics, Dissipative particle dynamics) (d) free energy methods either in MD|DPD or Monte Carlo simulations the ISP will be helpful to CDISE, CDMM, CEST or CHR students whose mater thesis is related to molecular | mesoscale simulations

Introduction to Reinforcement Learning, 22 hours (I-28-19)

Credits:0.81

Successful students will: - Be able to apply methods of Reinforcement Learning to their practical tasks, which require the application of decision-making techniques - Know how to choose an appropriate type of Reinforcement Learning algorithm, which is efficient for a concrete problem of interest (value-based vs policy-based, on-policy vs off- policy, sufficient exploration strategy) - Be able to continue their study of Reinforcement Learning on an advanced level - Be able to read, analyze and reproduce results of modern articles dedicated to the eld of Reinforcement Learning

Presentation Skills and Academic Communication, 24 hours (I-28-20)

Credits:0.89

Would you like to tell the Academic Community about your Research clearly, elegantly and professionally? Speaking in front of the international multi-disciplinary professional audience can be a challenge even for the experienced speakers. In this Course, the students will build and improve their skills, broaden their knowledge and get confidence to make effective presentations in English. The participants will practice a whole range of presentation techniques and formats, get feedback and set targets for their future presentations. Join this Course and practice making presentations with visual aids (slides, poster, and whiteboard). You will learn about the specifics of academic presentations in terms of form and content, and polish your language skills with the focus on intelligibility, pronunciation, and rhetoric.

Topics

Aims, Audience and Structure. Effective opening and closing

Visual Elements. Talking about Facts and Figures.

Impact techniques. Transitions. Attracting and Retaining Attention.

Smooth structure and Storytelling

Manage yourself, manage your audience: Body language. Cultural specifics. Rapport building.

Applying what you have learned: Final Presentations/ Mini-conference + Q&A

Modular Synthesis with VCV Rack, 21 hours (I-29-19)

Credits:0.78

Modular synthesis is a paradigm for making music through the interaction and composition of multiple specialized modules, each performing a specific function. Modular synthesizers take a constructive approach to writing music, with every aspect of the resulting sound being designed from the ground up. They are ubiquitous in the world of electronic music, and offer a completely different workflow to most Digital Audio Workstations. By completing this course, a student will: * Learn the elements of modular synthesis * Gain practical skills enabling them to produce their own music in VCV rack * Deepen their appreciation for and understanding of the subtleties of synthesized music

Express Academic Writing, 33 hours (I-29-20)

Credits:1.22

The ability to communicate ideas and report research findings in writing is one of the key factors of academic success. Academic writing in English is challenging for the non-native speakers who are expected to produce papers, reports, and dissertations acceptable for the international professional community.
    Contrary to popular belief, it is impossible to become a professional writer overnight. Moreover, there is no such thing as a “perfect first draft”. Writing is a skill, and its mastery requires a considerable investment of time and effort.
    The Course is designed to develop a conscious approach to academic writing through the analysis of authentic texts, intensive writing and editing practice. The ‘process-for-product’ approach takes the students through the whole writing cycle as they are learning to write a draft and use the reviewer's advice to edit, refine and polish it.  The Course focuses on the specifics of the main parts of the research paper in terms of structure, vocabulary, grammar, and style.

I can’t promise you a miracle; I can promise hard work and rewarding experience. And in the end, you will be much better equipped to write a research paper.

 

Topic

Summary of Topic

Academic Writing: Grammar, Vocabulary, Style.
Research paper outline.

Overview of the main features of Academic language: peculiarities of vocabulary, grammar and style. Formality and its manifestations. The main scientific genres.
An outline of a research paper: the main parts and their linguistic characteristics.

Academic Integrity. Working with sources. Quotation. Referencing. Reference managers. Bibliography

Academic Integrity vs plagiarism. Working with sources. Quotation. Referencing. Reference managers. Bibliography. Summary. Paraphrase.

Abstract

Abstract: structure, vocabulary, grammar. Coherence in a concise text.

Mind map- Annotated bibliography - Literature Review

Getting sources and ideas arranged and organized: Mid Map and Annotated bibliography. Literature review: structure, vocabulary, grammar. Key elements. Comparison and contrast.

Materials and methods section

Materials and method: structure, vocabulary, grammar. Visual elements. Describing data. Passive voice

Writing about Results and Discussion section

Results: Structure, vocabulary, grammar.
Discussion section: structure, vocabulary, grammar.
Cause and effect. Hedging.

Introduction and Conclusion

Introduction and Conclusion: structure, vocabulary, grammar. Summary, Paraphrase (revision)

Presentation slides

Structure, vocabulary and grammar of slides. Tips for visual layout.

Bringing it together: Mini-conference

Mini-conference at which participants report their findings

Deep Dive in a World of Electronics: How to Design and Assemble Electronic Circuits, 26 hours (I-30-19)

Credits:0.96

The students will learn about electronic components and their physical behavior, they will learn how to put them together and solve simple circuits by hands and complex one with the help of common software. We'll go through the selection of the components from well known sellers and at the end the students will design and assemble independently a custom circuit on their own. While in Skoltech there is no electronics course, this short introduction aims to give the students a wide view on how to design electronic system and this will become very useful when they will need this skills for some project of other courses.

Digital Literacy, 7 hours (I-30-20)

Credits:0.26

The purpose of the course is to increase students' awareness about modern digital tools for research in academia and teach how to use them for a more organized research process. By the end of the course, participants will be able to - recognize and proficiently use resources available at Skoltech - organize their preliminary research process - perform comprehensive search in bibliographic databases - navigate through multiple research tools and utilise each for their unique purposes - evaluate the quality of their search results - practice legal usage of licensed materials - manage their references in appropriate styles - manage collected data for use during the active phase of the research project and for future researchers to discover, interpret, and reuse the data.

Before the course students should get themselves familiar with the information on the library's webpage at https://www.skoltech.ru/en/education/library/

Main Theme

Topics covered

Academic search for information

1. Current state of academic publishing 2. Google Scholar - to use or not to use 3. Scopus and Web of Science in your research 4. Scopus hands on practice 5. Alternatives on the market (Microsoft academic, Semantic Scholar, Lens, Dimensions.ai, MathSciNet)

Usage of electronic resources

1. Approved and prohibited uses 2. Violations of license agreements

Reference management tools

1. What are they for 2. How to integrate them in your research process

Data management and sharing

1. What is data + types of data 2. Research data management - why should you manage it? 3. Data management across research life cycle 4. Data sharing - benefits and challenges

Solar Observations with a Telescope, 15 hours (I-31-19)

Credits:0.56

The purpose of the ISP course is to give a brief understanding of how astrophotography works, how should we work with a telescope and what we can observe with it in conditions of living in Moscow. The other part is headed to give students an introduction to Solar Physics, which events we can observe on the Sun, what information we can receive from this data and why it is important to know. We expect to provide lectures and 1-2 practical classes of observing the Sun, plus the session of data processing.

Mysterious Russian Soul: Russian Language, History, Culture, 30 hours (I-32-19)

Credits:1.11

The main goal is to learn the Russian language (for international students) and to help make a cultural exchange (for Russian students). At the end of this course, students will know the main points of the Russian history, the magnificent shapes of the Russian culture and key phrases for communication in Russia. There will be the lecture time in Moscow (three times per week) for a better understanding of Russian culture and history through architecture, the content of museums, ballet, and traditional dances. As a result, it is expected, that these students in the future will recommend to other potential students how great it is to study in our country and there is no need to be afraid of bears!

Russian Traditional Culture (Genesis, Dynamic, Modernity), 45 hours (I-32-20)

Credits:1.67

Series of lectures based on the results of expeditions provide a unique opportunity to students to see an otherwise inaccessible side of Russia.  

The rich Russian folklore heritage will be introduced to students, using materials from instructor's personal collection.

Students listening to the course will have a unique opportunity to investigate and watch rituals deeply rooted in pre-Christian times, and to watch performance of music and narrative folklore masterpieces. They will have an impression from Russian folk culture not like about collection of museum exhibits but like about alive, high poetic form of creative activity of human beings deserved to be included in the internationalcatalogue of folklore masterpieces.

Through the investigation of Russian traditional culture, will have an opportunity better understand Russian history, literature and language. The lectures are planned as special course for the students who are interested in Russian literature, language, history, sociology and cultural anthropology.

Lecture 1: What is Russian traditional culture? (The difference between folklore culture and author’s culture)

Lecture 2: The dynamic of traditional folklore genres (system of folklore genres)

Lecture 3: Agriculture and the cycle of calendar rituals (Christmas holy days, Maslenitsa, Easter, Trinity week)

Lecture 4 : Traditional and modern winter rituals (New Year, Christmas and Maslenitsa)

Lecture 5: Folklore and religion (what do we celebrate on Easter)

Lecture 6:The role of women in Russian summer rituals and in modern rural communities.

Lecture 7: The national conception of happiness and luck: an analysis of Russian cycle of family rituals (birth-rituals, wedding, funeral)

Lecture 8: Archetypes in family relationships and their origins in traditional Russian wedding customs.

 Lecture 9 : The traditional conception of death and traditional Russian funeral customs.

Lecture 10: The phenomenon of collective emotions in the analysis of traditional Russian lyric songs.

Lecture 11: Modern social fears and their origins: traditional belief legends about house and nature spirits.

Lecture 12: Breaking a mirror will give you seven years of bad luck: Traditional and contemporary superstitions as a phenomenon of every-day Russian life.

Lecture 13: A healer or a witch: traditional healing and witchcraft.

Lecture 14: Technical progress and folklore: unresolved conflict or possible cooperation?

Lecture 15: Final conclusions. Discussion of results

Working with Sequential Data, 27 hours (I-33-19)

Credits:1

Students will acquire a solid foundation in sequential data, primarily time series. The expected outcome is that they are able to solve problems involving time-series data in the areas of analysis, regression, classification, and clustering. Given that the course will focus on applications, students from all backgrounds can learn something useful for their day-to-day work. Time series are pervasive in all disciplines from signal processing to finance. Therefore, it is imperative as data scientists to have a solid understanding of this field.

Power of Storytelling, 12 hours (I-34-19)

Credits:0.44

Storytelling is an essential skill that is used to motivate other people and call for action. Through stories, we are able to tap into people’s values (rather than just issues) and evoke emotions that move people from inaction to action - while opening the space for hope, anger, urgency, solidarity, and sense that we can make a difference. Each of us has stories that can move others. Through this mini-course, you will be able to combine narratives that come from your own experiences, the lives of the people you meet, from your audience’s experiences and from what is currently facing us, and structure these into a compelling story. === By the end of the course, the learners are expected to: - analyze key components of a story - experiment with different storytelling plots - create, develop and tell stories that evoke actions

Industry Career Building - How to Get a Job of Your Dream, 12 hours (I-35-19)

Credits:0.44

Clear picture on how to move towards industrial career Better understanding of Russian R&D sector (and foreign R&D with Russian location) Job interview skills CV preparing skills (including for industrial immersion) Vision of Skoltech instruments to increase chances to get a great job (and how to benefit more from industrial immersion) It helps to start thinking and planning a career in industry in advance Moves closer to solving the problem of finding a for job in Russia There is usually a lack of time to prepare a good CV

Research Project, 40 hours (I-36-19)

Credits:1.48

Presentation Skills and Academic Communication, 21 hours (I-37-19)

Credits:0.78

Would you like to tell the Academic Community about your Research clearly, elegantly and professionally? Speaking in front of the international multi-disciplinary professional audience can be a challenge even for the experienced speakers. In this Course, the students will build and improve their skills, broaden their knowledge and get confidence to make effective presentations in English. The participants will practice a whole range of presentation techniques and formats, get feedback and set targets for their future presentations. Join this Course and practice making presentations with visual aids (slides, poster, and whiteboard). You will learn about the specifics of academic presentations in terms of form and content, and polish your language skills with the focus on intelligibility, pronunciation, and rhetoric.

Introduction to Social Studies of Science and Technology, 12 hours (I-38-19)

Credits:0.44

This class will discuss contemporary problems of the philosophy and sociology of science and technology, adapted for students who might have never had classes on social or political theory before. Some knowledge of philosophy (at the high school level) is presupposed, though. The class should provide natural, exact or data science specialists with basic knowledge of the sociology of everyday life, anthropology of science, sociology of complex socio-technical systems, and social aspects of the impending climate change

Disrupt Skoltech Hackathon, 31 hours (I-39-19)

Credits:1.15

Disrupt Skoltech hackathon has the goal to develop Skoltech Social network (something like Linked In + Facebook + …) which may be used as base for better connection in our community, leading to alumni network, base for search for mentors and several other ideas students came with.

Financial Literacy and Personal Finance, 30 hours (IS-01-20)

Credits:1.11

In recent decades, financial products and services have become increasingly widespread throughout society. Today various products are popular, such as credit cards, mortgages, self-directed investment accounts etc., and none can avoid dealing with financial services. With the importance of this part of everyday life, lacking financial literacy can be damaging for individual in the long-term. At the same time, a strong foundation of financial literacy can help support various life goals, such as saving for education or retirement, using debt responsibly, and running a business.

Main Purpose: The main purpose of this course is to familiarize students with different sides of financial world, its opportunities and dangers. Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience): The course aims to familiarize students with standard banking and investment products and general financial system structure. We will discuss ways to estimate assets value and underlying financial risks and consider common examples from life. After this course, students will hopefully feel more confident when dealing with financial services, as well as reading news articles on related topics.

Main Theme

Topics Covered

Financial system and its key terms

Financial market participants. Role of regulator. Fiscal and monetary policy. Interest rates.

Personal Finance: Budgeting

Budget, Financial Goals, Financial Planning

Basic banking products

Deposit, Loan, Mortgage, Currency Operations, Compound Interest, Time Value of Money

Investment

Types of securities, bonds, shares, investment goals, risk and return, liquidity, diversification

Interesting Stories from Financial World

Tulip mania. Bubbles. Financial Crisis, etc.

Algorithmic Python, 30 hours (IS-02-20)

Credits:1.11

I believe that programming skills are no less important today than knowledge of English. Many people are afraid to start coding because they think this is only for computer geeks with a mathematical mindset. But programming is actually easy, interesting, and rewarding. And this course will prove it to you.

The course is designed for beginners in computer sciences. No prior knowledge of Python or algorithms is required.

Main Purpose: The course is aimed to dip your toe in the basics of algorithms and data structures with Python language. There will be no sophisticated libraries or aging skills.

Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience): After completing the course, you will be able to solve simple algorithmic problems efficiently with Python. The acquired knowledge of algorithms will never become outdated. Once you get your gait in solving problems, you'll be able to develop your skills further by yourself.

Main Theme

Topics Covered

Python language.

Why python? History of python. Installation of Python3 and PyCharm IDE. code_style.

Abstract Data Types.

How computer represents data. Atomic data types. Numeric types. Assignments. Expressions. While and for loops. If statements. Why float is dangerous.

Built-in Collection data types.

Strings. Lists. Tuples. Dictionaries. Files. Fractions. Stack and queue.

Big O notation.

Why do we need algorithms? Complexity of scripts. Measuring time. Methods and arguments. Scopes.

Object oriented programming.

Why use classes? Everything is an object. Polymorphism. Inheritance. Composition.

Recursion.

Greedy algorithms and dynamic programming.

Advanced topics.

Lambda. Exceptions. Decorators. Magic methods. Algorithms on graphs. Brainteasers. What to do next?

All You Need to Know About Satellites, 27 hours (IS-03-20)

Credits:1

This course is about why new satellites are still very important although the population of man-made objects in space – including space junk - is already large. We will create a 3D model of a satellite in Blender, then take Python algorithms (it is going to be simple, have no fear) that rotate Satellite, and implement them in Blender to animate 3D rotations! (sure, you can use this skill in your field of study to make nice animations). So, everyone will end up with a model of his personal small (probably a simple one) but a Satellite! Then comes the time for the invited speakers. Skoltech Space Center students & specialists will give a few talks about the whole range of Satellite applications. We will discuss Solar observation missions and how Reinforcement Learning helps to design them. Also such topics as Global Telecom Ecosystem, Asteroid Mining, Formation of Satellites (maybe even more guests will join us). And all that will be presented using simple, engaging terms :) After such inspiration and knowledge, the students will pick up the most attractive application for the Satellite, and all together we will see how a mission is designed, discuss how satellites determine their position and orientation in space, how they change orbits, and how they rotate, how they send the data to Earth, where they take power, etc. We will also cover the most interesting, challenging problems that Satellites face and ways to solve those problems using data science.

Main Purpose: learn how satellites are helping us to learn more about the universe we live in and improve our life on Earth, how satellites work, which problems are still needed to be solved, and how different ranges of knowledge can be helpful in Space Mission Design.

Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience): - drawing 3D animation in Blender using Python algorithms to rotate it; - understanding of what is going on in Space now and what is the trend for the future; - what the World Space Industry now is focusing on; - knowledge and experience in a Space mission and Satellite design.

Main Theme

Topics Covered

Introduction

1) Space Debris and ways to solve this problem; 2) Overview of satellite applications.

How today’s satellite look like and how do they work

1. Overview of satellite subsystems; 2. Draw a simple 3D model of Satellite in Blender; 3. Learn simple equations in Python to rotate the Satellite, and apply them to the 3D model in Blender - to get rotating animation!

Learn more about Satellite applications

Skoltech Space Center student & specialists will give a few talks about the whole range of Satellite applications: - Solar missions and how Satellite is literally hovering at the libration point; - Next-Generation Global Telecom Ecosystem; - Telecom communication between Rovers on Mars and the Earth through satellites;

Learn more about Satellite applications 2

Continue Space Center student & specialists talking about Satellite applications: - Scientific missions and satellite formations (swarm, group of Satellites) - Asteroid Mining - And other applications

Satellites subsystems

1. Satellite orientation and stabilization 2. Power, telecom and other subsystems 3. Problems that Satellite faces, ways to solve them using Data Science. Open challenges.

Mission design

1. Concept of operations 2. Mission examples 3. How much it can cast to develop a Space Mission 4. If have time - watching a film about space mission :)

Student presentations & results & discussions

+ overview of inspiring Worldwide Space Companies: what they are doing, which specialists do they need and how cool is their company mission!

Algorithmic Design, 30 hours (IS-04-20)

Credits:1.11

Inside this course you will combine your technical skills with the creative vision to create some beautiful results.

Main Purpose: Understand how to create algorithmic design inside the houdini software. There are a total of 21 questions with 2 different solutions for each on this course for you to explore the multiple possibilities in order to construct the procedural modelling process.

Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience): working inside the houdini software what nodes are available in houdini what can be achieved in houdini how you can use houdini in your research how to visualize mathematical equations.

  Topics Covered      
  01. Look at a target 02. Contouring 03. Random walk 04. Move along path 05. Switch objects 06. Sloped roof 07. Snow on object 08. Voxelize object 09. Attractor transformation 10. Variation layout on grid 11. Undulated panels 12. Rotational slicing 13. Image remeshing 14. Vector field control 15. Gouged surface 16. Particle morphing 17. Silhouette morphing 18. Isosurface lattice 19. Braid rope 20. Fractal column 21. Surface marbling

Negotiation Tips and Tricks, 30 hours (IS-05-20)

Credits:1.11

Negotiation has been emphasized several times by World Economic Forum as one of the most important soft skills to succeed. This course has summarized the most famous tips and tricks of negotiation in 60 short tips in an interesting way. It is a result of 5-years studying negotiation in different courses, workshops, books and articles.

Main Purpose: During the course, we will offer a series of negotiation techniques to increase the knowledge of students on negotiation and help them to build more productive negotiations during their studies and careers. We expect that students who participated in this course get better results in their negotiations.

Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience): After this course, we expect that participants:
• Can search and find useful books and websites and courses for negations skills learning
• List and describe some of the most famous tips and tricks of negotiation
• Distinguish tips and tricks while listening to a negations
• Understand why along with principles knowing tricks is important
• Identify the proper time for a particular negotiation tip
• Capable of applying some of the tips in a roleplay negotiation
• Analyze a simple interview and report abut used tips or tricks

Main Theme

Topics Covered

The basic explanation of tips with examples

Techniques summarized in the form of 60 tips, for example: - Tip 1: Guidelines for picking the right technique - Tip 2: The risk of forgetting yourself - Tip 3: Common mental picture of a professional negotiator - Tip 4: Where not to negotiate? The full list is available in this link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1L-sx8Yh_iNTmCtnnGsArZk_uuJXW9IPT/view?usp=sharing

Group discussions

After each hour of the lectures, there are a group discussions on personal opinions about presented techniques, how they think it's useful or not, or how it would be applicable in reality.

Public discussions

Along with the public comments in groups, public discussions and expressing personal opinions and asking questions in the main class is highly welcomed.

Game-based learning

A list of question in the interesting way and through a competitive environment helps students to review the content and test their knowledge.

Deep Work, Productivity and Getting Things Done, 17 hours (IS-06-20)

Credits:0.63

We live in a digital world where distractions are rampant and these distractions deeply affect productivity. At the same time, the concept of depth and focus is increasingly becoming lost due to the constant distractions we are subjected to. Because our work lack depth, the output is shallow. What is even worse is that shallow work confuses busyness for productivity when in actual fact being productive and being busy are two distant concepts. In this course, I intend to explore the thesis of Deep Work as elegantly explained by Professor Cal Newport in his 2016 book called Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World. Hopefully, by the end of the course, students should know how to enhance productivity by eliminating distractions and prioritising focus.

Main Purpose: The most important goal of this course is for students to enhance productivity by identifying and eliminating attention traps that are designed to derail productivity. Students will learn very simple productivity-enhancing strategies that they can in-cooperate in their daily schedules. This course revolves around the idea of cultivating a culture of deep work so that they can thrive in their respective endeavours by embracing the power of directed focus.

Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience): Time management Minimising distractions Strategies to overcome procrastination How to Prioritizing focus

Topics Covered

• Choosing Your Deep Work Strategy • Building a Deep Work Routine • Making Focus Your Default Mode • Eliminating Digital Distractions • Choosing Your Digital Toolset Wisely • Purging Shallow Work From Your Life • How to Stop Procrastinating by Using the Two-Minute Rule • The 80/20 Rule of Time Management

Industrial Automation - Introduction to PLC Programming, 30 hours (IS-07-20)

Credits:1.11

Everyone who is interested in how industrial automation works and how to program a PLC (for example, SIEMENS SIMATIC S7 - 1200) + WEINTEK operator panel. The purpose of the course: to acquaint students with industrial automation, how to organize work, how to choose suitable sensors, how to program a PLC, how to transfer data from PLC to HMI.

Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience): Lesson topics: 1. 2. PLC device, FBD language of IEC 61131-3 standard (mention ST and Ladder Diagram) Write tank level control code - in 4 languages ??in a test environment. 3. Programming environment using the example of TIA Portal v15 (or even v16). Project simulation, Function blocks. Working with variables 4. Industrial interfaces, Modbus rtu protocol, remote dispatching via SMS, vpn, rs-485 5. Connecting the display to the PLC and transferring data between them 6. Final testing. Everyone chooses their language and do their homework.

Main Theme

Topics Covered

Intro

Block 1. Part A 1. Industrial automation approach to project design of control system, 2. types of signals, 3. types of sensors, 4. Real examples from the industry ---- Course expectations

PLC standard languages

Block 1. Part B 1. PLC - why is so important in industrial Automation projects? 2. Languages for PLC programming (LD, ST, FBD) ----- Explanation of HW1

IDE

Block 2. Part A IDE for PLC - TIA PORTAL v15 of v16 How to start project in this IDE Functional blocks

HMI

Block 2. Part B WEINTEK display Integration PLC and HMI Intro to industrial interfaces

Industrial interfaces

Block 3. Part A 1. Industrial interfaces: Modbus rtu, rs-485, etc 2. Data transfering b/n PLC & HMI

 

Block 3. Part B CONSULTATION BEFORE FINAL TEST SUM UP All lectors before

Music Without Borders, 30 hours (IS-08-20)

Credits:1.11

There is a misconception among aspiring or beginner musicians that they think of music theory as a prescriptive discipline, one which prescribes rules and regulations for which you must follow; otherwise, you will be wrong. It leads them to think that learning music theory will stifle their creativity because then they will have to mechanically fit all of their compositions according to a set of prescribed rules and regulations. Moreover, they think that music theory is useless because of this fact. Hence, they do not bother to learn music theory in the process of learning an instrument. In reality, music theory is a descriptive discipline that tries to describe music as it is made, free of any artistic or stylistic judgment. In other words, it provides a set of tools to explain the concepts of music as a language. Moreover, it also provides a useful set of tools to communicate with fellow musicians. So learning music theory is important for musicians, just like having an understanding of a back-end of code is important for coders. Hence, this course provides an opportunity for beginner musicians to have a deeper understanding of the musical language. It will enable them to grasp the theoretical frameworks of different compositions and develop communication with other musicians in an effective way. They will learn the thought process behind the composition. It will make them better musicians. This course does not require its participants to be musicians. If any student aspires to learn a musical instrument in the future, he/she can take this course to develop a strong fundamental of music. It would facilitate the learning process. Since we are at Skoltech, which is truly a diverse place, this course should include diversity. Hence, this course aims to cover music theories from different parts of the World, which explains the name: Music without Borders. Students taking this course will be able to understand and appreciate music from across the globe, which would not only make them a better musician but also enable them to acknowledge and appreciate diverse cultures of the World. This course is unique because it not only covers fundamental components of music theory for aspirants and beginners but also provides a fresh and different perspective of music for experienced musicians. Therefore, this course is designed for anyone who appreciates and loves music. In this course, students will work in groups of three members. Apart from learning basic concepts, they will listen to different pieces and songs. They will compose musical compositions. They will research music theories from across the globe. In other words, students will learn about music theory in a fun and inclusive way. In conclusion, this course is useful for students (aspiring and new musicians) because it makes a strong foundation for music theory, which will enhance their creativity and collaboration. This course enables students to live the meaning of studying in a technical and diverse institution.

MainPurpose: Understanding Music Theory from different lenses.

Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience):
A. A deep understanding of concepts from Western Music Theory
B. Learning Musescore: music composition and notation software
C. Applying the concepts of Music Theory to compose a short musical piece in Musescore.
D. Comprehending South Asian Music Theory and its parallels with Western Music Theory
E. Comparing Music Theories from different parts of the World: Music without Borders.
F. A deeper appreciation and interest in music.

Main Theme

Topics Covered

Introduction to the course

The purpose of the course. Why music theory? What is music without borders? Expectations from the course. Assessments and group projects. Starting with the theory: Recognizing different terms. Revising the terms from 1st lecture. Understanding the Pitch Notation. Analyzing these concepts with examples.

Music Theory 101

Reviewing concepts from last time. Explaining Major and Minor Scales. Explaining Intervals. Classifying Triads/Chords. Analyzing these concepts with examples. Starting with Musescore (Application).

Music Theory 102

Expanding the theory of Chords: Inversions and Extensions. Introducing the Concept of Rhythms. Understanding Rhythmic Notations. Starting with Modal Music. Analyzing rhythms with examples. Examining the examples of Modal Music. Composing simple melody lines in Musescore.

Music without Borders: South Asian Music

Overview of Music without borders. What is South Asian Music. Components of South Asian Music. Instrumentations in South Asian Music. Origins of Raga Music. Understanding Ragas. Comparing Ragas with Modal Music. Understanding Talas. Parallels of Talas and Western Rhythms. Ornamentations in Indian Music. Performance styles. Deeper understanding with Examples.

Music without Borders: Western Classical and Modern Music

What is Western Classical Music. Baroque Period (1580-1750). Classical Period (1750-1820). Romantic Period (1800-1910). Impressionistic Period (Early 20th century.) Modern Music (Late 20th century). Analyzing musical pieces from these periods using all the learned concepts.

Final Assessment

Presentation 1 (Composition in MuseScore) (Time: Portion of 2nd Lab from Music Theory 102) Presentation 2 (Music without Borders) (Time: 2nd Lab from Music without Borders: South Asian Music) Online Exam (Assessing the above-listed topics) (Time: Lab from Music without borders: Western Classical and Modern Music)

Start a Radio Station from Scratch, 24 hours (IS-09-20)

Credits:0.89

Music making and hosting online sessions are new areas for students. The outcomes of this course can be considered as a creative part of the education and broadening students spheres of interest. The course is designated to develop practical skills that would allow one to organize a web radio channel. We learn all aspects of how to create the station from scratch. Moreover we learn how to create the content for radio and will practice at hosting our own online sessions. From the social aspect of current online learning, which is related to the worldwide pandemic situation, the lack of communication among the university society is extremely tangible. We want to boost students' social activity and communications during this course. Additionally students have an opportunity to create their projects, and then to be a part of Skoltech university radio team.

Main Purpose:
- create web radio channel
- learn aspects of audio broadcasting, hosting radio station
- practice skills related to hosting and managing your station

Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience): Students will get a full scope introduction “what has to be done” for broadcast production. The aspects planned to cover during the course are:
- Radio station: understand the background, how the radio is operating
- Try different roles of radio team: DJ, interviewer, content planner, podcaster and host
- Setup and maintain your own station
- Content making: music production and collection management, legal issues
- Broadcast communication practice: host live sessions, storytelling.

The goal of our team is to create a university radio. We are willing to discuss this project during the course. People interested in this topic are greatly welcome to participate. During the course the students will practice live sessions hosting and storytelling. We expect students to play with music production tools and record their own live sessions. In practical aspects, the first and central aspect of this course is broadcasting with LiquidSoap & IceCast. Students will familiarize themselves with LiquidSoap programming language which is the most common tool for audio/video broadcasting via a streaming server known as IceCast/SHOUTcast or others. This programming language is a versatile tool that renders broadcasting to be an easy solution, simplifies bringing DJs online, “A swiss army knife” as they call it.

What will students not learn: Writing good music is challenging. So we will not teach you here. We will just present the tools for your quick start. Writing music requires time and motivation.

Main Theme

Topics Covered

Intro to broadcasting

List main programs for broadcasting. Maintaining a radio station.

Radio server setup

How to set up your radio. Liquidsoap

Audiocollection management

Auto DJ. How does it works

Public speaking

How to speak to public audience

Content making

Dealing with GDPR. Intro to music auto generation.

Broadcast communication practice

Psychology of communication, Storytelling

Go broadcast

Final presentation

Kirill's Gambit: Strategic Thinking 64, 30 hours (IS-10-20)

Credits:1.11

“Make sure your resume says that you play chess. It shows you are a strategic thinker”, advised the older businessman to the young man networking into an industry trade group. There are two concepts that all chess players must understand from the start: strategy and tactics. During this class, we will consider strategic thinking and fast tactical actions using chess example. Why chess? On one hand, this is an ancient, wise game that teaches you to think independently and make decisions [2], fight and not lose heart in case of failures and develop will; it also enhances IQ, concentration skills, and memory that is highly beneficial for students [3]. On the other hand, chess is extremely flexible and fast adapting to contemporary needs. Nowadays, you need only a smartphone/laptop to study and play chess. So you will have a secret weapon to boost your brain while just chilling with one of the most popular online games that brighten the lockdown [3]. There will be discussions, presentions, communication, and fun. Topics are flexible and diverse, discussions are connected with chess pieces interaction, business, science, etc. [1] https://www.brainscape.com/academy/does-chess-make-you- smarter/#:~:text=Chess%20can%20raise%20your%20IQ&text=In%20a%20review%20of%20th e,these%20results%20of%20skill%20transfer. [2] http://scienceonthesquares.blogspot.com/2014/08/a-scientific-approach-to-chess.html#:~:text=Usually%2C%20chess%20is%20used%20as,systematic%20way%20to%20solve%20problems. [3] https://theconversation.com/chess-is-taking-over-the-online-video-game-world-and- both-are- changing-from-this-unlikely-pairing-143790

Main Purpose: To study chess as a tool to improve your memory, expertise, and decision making

Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience):
- scientific elements in chess,
- adaptive decision making,
- long-term strategic thinking and planning,
- fast tactical actions,
- handling your time-management,
- persisting stress in critical situations,
- a desire to never give up,
- ability to move chess pieces,
- knowledge of chess history,
- experience in debating on scientific, historical, entrepreneurial, and chess topics

Main Theme

Topics Covered

Chess and thinking

What is chess? Basic chess rules. A role of chess in history and culture. How chess can improve thinking skills and memory? Difference in thinking between people.

Move pieces

Debate on strategy of team building and networking for reaching tactical goals. Decision making on your team: interactions between pieces on a chessboard.

Strategy

Discussion on strategy as a long-term resource planning to strengthen your position. Gradual business development. Strategies of competitors.

Tactics

Mathematics and probability in chess. Tactics - reaction to incidental events. Persisting stress while pressed for time. Sacrifices your exessive materials for faster development. Grab money and spend less. Beautiful examples of sacrifices.

The mentality of success

Famous chessplayers and their mindset. Transforming failures to successes. Invited Speakers from business and chess tell their life stories. Discussion of Queen`s Gambit movie. Kirill`s Gambit online.

CitSciHack: Turn Your Thesis into a Game, 30 hours (IS-11-20)

Credits:1.11

The CitSciHack course is designed for students to learn about the vast world of citizen science (CS), the power of crowdsourcing, and methods of solving scientific problems with these instruments. During the course, students will build up a citizen science project from scratch, with expert help from the team of the “People of Science” — the first citizen science aggregator in Russia. Within three weeks students will make a full cycle through all stages of CS project development: from a scientific problem to a user-friendly solution through product and UX/UI design. Best teams will be awarded and the best projects will be published with acknowledgments. Guest lecturers will talk about the current state of citizen science in Russia and in the world, share their experience in science communication and its facilitation, give basic principles of product and UX/UI design. Students will learn the basics of creating science storytelling and the formats of presenting their projects to different audiences. Students will work in small groups, which gives students experience in teamwork and close to life experience of project development and management. Through multiple presentations during the course, students will get practical experience in science communication and learn how to communicate a scientific problem to non-experts. Students will upgrade their soft skills while interacting with people from different backgrounds, brainstorming together, solving conflicts, and finding the best solution.

Main Purpose: Learning to use crowdsourcing to solve complicated tasks, particularly in science, by applying innovative methods to work with data, people and projects in a way that enhances benefits for very different stakeholders.

Learning Outcomes (knowledge-skills-experience), by the end of the course students will be able to:
- List main principles and ideas of citizen science;
- Know how to promote your project, how to talk about it;
- Understand principles of crowdsourcing and its application to scientific problems;
- Understand methods of transformation of complicated scientific problems into interesting tasks for volunteers;
- Understand the motivation of citizen scientists and how to make a product attractive for them;
- Identify/outline meaningful scientific problem;
- Analyze existing CS methods and choose the best-fitting ones;
- Analyze the motivation of volunteers;
- Predict attractiveness of the product — for both the volunteers and scientists;
- Choose the best way to present and promote your project;
- Solve the given scientific problem with instruments of crowdsourcing;
- Transform complicated problem into easy-to-manage tasks for volunteers;
- Utilize practical tricks of how to make a boring task engaging;
- Communicate with people of different background;
- Practice science communication;
- Find data quickly and critically evaluate it from the scientific point of view;
- Develop the whole pipeline of data analysis for CS project
- Create an internal logic of whole scientist-volunteer interaction pipeline;
- Build a CS project from scratch.

Main Theme

Topics Covered

What is citizen science.

Course objectives and outline. Introduction to crowdsourcing in science. Citizen and community science. Main principles. History of CS. Open science as a trend. Examples of most popular and successful projects. Who are the "People of Science"? Hands-on experience and discussion in groups. Analysis of CS projects' structure. Problem statement.

CS for scientists.

How to identify a problem. How to formulate a scientific question. How to evaluate its relevance and social significance. Datasets presentation in small groups, discussion (one to be chosen). Presentation of most promising datasets in class. Group formation based on interest in a specific dataset. Start of group work and discussion of possible scientific problems to solve.

CS for society.

Why do people engage in scientific crowdsourcing? Motivation of citizen scientists. How to split a complicated idea into small tasks. List of common activities type doable for volunteers. How to make a routine task fascinating and engaging for volunteers. Examples discussion (good and bad). Projects walk-through in teams, discussion. Team work on the project.

Product design.

Differences between product design and UX/UI design. How the first makes sure the product serves its purpose under given circumstances and the second makes sure it is comfortable to use. Examples and analysis. The mechanics of a CS project. Setting lines of questioning, logical branching and algorithm. Ways of quality control in CS project. How to make sure that voluteers' effort will be usable and useful for the scientists. Examples and discussion.Team work.

UX/UI design.

UX/UI design basics, presentation, simplification, visual support & instructions, user-friendly interface, CJM, interaction with volunteers & feedback, rewards. Explanations if needed. Cross-evaluation of other team's prototypes in groups, discussion. Team work.

Science Communication.

Is there life after the release? How to promote your project. How to invent a story behind the project. Tips and tricks of science communication. Examples of successful campagns behind CS projects. Team work. Consultations on final presentations.

Final presentation.

Project presentations. Q&A session, discussion. Winners announcement. Closing remarks, further interaction options. Feedback.

Short-term Research Project (MA0200R1)

Credits:2

Materials Selection in Design (MA030099)

Credits:3

This course illustrates the need for a scientific and practical method of selection of appropriate materials in the design for industrial application. It includes the review of the principles of materials science including materials classification, hierarchical structuring, related properties, and performance of different class of materials such as natural materials, metals, ceramics, plastics, cellular solids. Ashby’s material selection algorithm for rational selection of materials for specific applications will be taught here in comprehensive way - analysis of function, objectives and constraints, deducing of performance indices. All the concepts covered in lectures will be practiced by using a commercially available software known as CES EduPack to implement data intensive learning. Individual course projects are aimed to taste the CDIO approach in Materials Selection for a product that must meet the sustainability requirements.

Short-term Research Project (MA0300R1)

Credits:3

Short-term Research Project (MA0300R2)

Credits:3

Additional Thesis Research (MA0300RT)

Credits:3

Computational Imaging (MA030121)

Credits:3

In the computational era of everything, imaging has not become an exception. Computational algorithms allow both to extract valuable information from a scene and to improve the very sensor that forms the image. Today, computational and image processing enhancements became integrable parts of any digital imager, be it a miniature smartphone camera or a complex space telescope. This crash course is designed as a prerequisite for those students who would like to venture into the field of Computer Vision. We will cover foundational mathematical equations that are involved in the image formation and in the geometric projection principles. The concept of Point Spread Function that distorts the object will be explained on particular examples and will be experimented with for the tasks of image reconstruction and denoising. Image processing will be covered with an emphasis on the Python libraries to be used in the rest of the imaging-related courses on the DS/IST tracks (openCV and others). A basic DSLR photo camera will be considered as a model for understanding Fourier Imaging and Filtering methods in a laboratory exercise. Hands-on tutorials on how to select a camera and a lens for your machine vision application will be provided. The theory of color and stereo light-field cameras will be covered using the models of commonplace Bayern RGB sensors; as well as state-of-art spectral and multi-lens imagers. The course will consist of three theoretical lectures riffled by three graded in-class laboratory coding sessions on the subjects covered in the theoretical lectures. 100% attendance is mandatory. There will be a single in-class exam during the evaluation week and no homework.

Modern Convex Optimization (MA030137)

Credits:3

Optical Communications (MA030157)

Credits:3

Transgenic Models in Drug Discovery (MA030223)

Credits:3

Plant Molecular Biology Lab Course (MA030330)

Credits:3

Plant Biotechnology Lab Course (MA030331)

Credits:3

Introduction to Computer Vision (MA030348)

Credits:3

Computer Vision is one of the most rapidly evolving subfields of Data Science with many applications, e. g. in autonomous driving and healthcare, among others. This course is designed to provide a comprehensive systematic introduction to the field. We'll start with the recognition of some simple object elements such as corners and edges and then proceed to the detection of more complex local features. All major problem statements such as image classification, object detection and segmentation as well as the corresponding classical algorithms will be covered within the course. Finally, we'll briefly introduce convolutional networks and discuss key deep learning architectures for the same set of problems. We'll extensively use Python and CV & image analysis libraries scikit-image and OpenCV during hands-ons and homeworks. The final grade will be calculated using the results of three homeworks (20% each) and the final project (40%).

High Performance Python Lab (MA030367)

Credits:3

This course is devoted to learning how to use Python for High Performance Computing on different architectures – multi-core CPUs and general purpose GPUs. The course is oriented on practical knowledge, where the students will get a hands-on experience with Python code profiling, modern Python frameworks, such as Python MultiProcessing, Numba, Cython, mpi4py, PyCuda and others. Wide range of problem sets from linear algebra, image processing, deep learning, physics and engineering makes this course interesting and suitable for all levels of students from all CREIs. Students will also get the possibility to work on modern supercomputers.

Molecular Neurobiology (MA030391)

Credits:3

The Molecular Neurobiology course gives students the basics of molecular organization and functional principles of the central nervous system. This is a theoretical course, describing the current vision of how the central nervous system works at the cellular, subcellular, and molecular levels. The course will also introduce current methods used to assess the functional organization of the nervous system at the molecular level, with a particular focus on studies of the human brain. The course will include both the textbook information, as well as recent findings not yet included in textbooks.

Neuroendocrinology (MA030392)

Credits:3

The course helps TAs and PhD students to understand and try pedagogical tools to get versatile collaborative, inquiring and educational experience. The course interactively leads through basic teacher fundamentals – competences, learning outcomes, and student-centered education and demonstrates teachers’ practices and technologies for organizing group work, problem-based education, project-based learning, case study, etc. The course also covers evaluation and feedback as a part of effective learning. Modules of the course are supplemented by interactive exercises to engage students in discussion and re-thinking on their experience concepts and technologies. Participants will design their own education event as the final project. Also during the course participants will take several practicums to upgrade presentation skills, skills for keeping education projects on track, skills of curriculum and outcome design.

Fundamentals of Post-Quantum Cryptography (MA030394)

Credits:3

Design of Chemical Sensors: from Fundamentals to Applications (MA030446)

Credits:3

Graphical Models for Optimization, Inference and Learning in Sciences and Engineering (MA030447)

Credits:3

Plant Biotechnology Lab 2 (MA030449)

Credits:3

Complex Networks (MA030469)

Credits:3

The aim of the course is to overview network science, and to explain basic ideas and tools used in analyzing large networks. Many modern networks are rapidly changing and growing, and the course emphasizes techniques suited to such classes of networks. We will start with networks growing via the addition of edges and show that at any instance they can be interpreted statically as random graphs. Other classes of growing networks are genuinely dynamic??. We will analyze the re-direction algorithm that is very efficient in generating rather realistic networks. The power of the choice algorithm, as well as the redirection algorithm, will be also covered.

Advanced Solvers for Numerical PDEs (MA030470)

Credits:3

Partial differential equations (PDEs) describe many phenomena around us: from tsunami propagation to neural currents in the human head. Given today’s accuracy demands in industrial and academic applications, numerical solution of the PDEs typically involves millions and even billions of unknowns. This course presents and analyses efficient algorithms for their fast and economical solution. We recall modern iterative solvers (Krylov subspace methods) and discuss robust economical preconditioners (Krylov subspace methods) and robust economical preconditioners (FFT-related, geometric and algebraic multigrid, and others) for the arising large discrete problems. We also look at the possibilities of machine learning and dimensionality reduction methods for numerical solution of the PDEs. We will concentrate on diffusive, time-harmonic electromagnetic and acoustic systems and models of fluid dynamics. Special emphasis will be on the design of the solvers for anisotropic and/or highly-heterogeneous problems, problems on nonuniform and unstructured computational grids. The homogenization technique as a means to extract homogeneous effective parameters from disordered or heterogeneous media will be discussed. Numerical modeling with both standard (finite-difference) and advanced discretization methods will be considered (finite element, mixed finite element, and discontinuous Galerkin). This course is intended to attract student of all majors interested in mathematical modeling of natural phenomena. Our examples include fluid mechanics, Earth sciences (PDEs arising in geophysical exploration), and life sciences (established and emerging imaging modalities).

Postgenomic Technologies for Precision Medicine (MA030472)

Credits:3

This course offers lectures, seminars, and practical classes on implementation of post-genomics multi-omics technologies for medicine. The course is a continuation of the “Biomedical Mass-spectrometry” and “Omics Technologies” courses. The course covers on-going Omics lab research studies in the field of infectious and somatic diseases (including COVID-19 and its health consequences), neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease) and various cancers. After an introduction to mass spectrometry (MS), the course will demonstrate how MS-based modern multi-Omics techniques (including those that are being developed at Skoltech) are being used to solve vital medical problems. Relevant clinical studies and cases will be discussed, including the multiplexed determination of the relative and absolute concentrations of different Omics markers in plasma, tissues, and other patient biofluids, the use of big data analysis to search for disease-specific molecular signatures for diagnostics/prognostics and for developing diagnostics kits. In addition, the visualization of Omics biomarkers on tissue sections by MALDI-MS will be demonstrated by our on-going studies (e.g., on brain tumor). MS-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of signaling pathways for the dissection tumor pathogenesis will also be demonstrated. A significant part of the course will be devoted to the implementation of bioinformatics and big data analysis tools, including machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) for clinical multi-omics studies, with demonstrations to show how it helps to improve therapeutic outcomes. By successfully completing this course, students will have acquired a deeper knowledge of how multi-Omics assays are used in medical research, the principals of bioinformatics and big data analysis for discovering prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers, and the generation of specific assays and kits to improve precision medicine.

Emerging Technologies for Next Generation Wireless Communications (MA030473)

Credits:3

Fifth generation mobile communications, rapidly deploying all around the globe, are promised to outperform the available solutions in terms of latency, energy-efficiency, and data rates. However, with its peak speed of about 10 Gb/s and channel bandwidth of 0.1-1 GHz this technology will turn out to be inadequate to meet the explosive growth of machine connectivity in the short run. This course is designed to provide the students with basic knowledge of terahertz technology, edge AI hardware design, and reconfigurable intelligent surfaces which are customarily identified as enabling technology towards wireless mobile communications beyond 5G. We will specifically touch upon reconfigurable intelligent surfaces that can potentially lead to enhanced energy and spectrum efficiency of wireless communications. In particular, we will elaborate on space-time-coding digital metasurfaces that are constituted by a programmable array of artificial unit cells each of which is characterized by its own electromagnetic response.

Permafrost and Natural Hydrates (MA03343)

Credits:3

Core Course Description

Short-term Research Project (MA0500R1)

Credits:5

Introduction to Language Technologies and Their Applications (MA060029)

Credits:6

Short-term Research Project (MA0600R1)

Credits:6

Short-term Research Project (MA0600R2)

Credits:6

Additional Thesis Research (MA0600RT)

Credits:6

Advanced Quantum Mechanics (MA060207)

Credits:6

Lecture Course “Advanced Quantum Mechanics” comprises a number of topics which are not included in standard courses on Quantum Mechanics. Meanwhile, these topics acquire increasing importance during last 2-3 decades due to developing applications in various branches of quantum condensed-matter physics theory dealing with many-body problems and problems of interaction between quantum particle and external bath. The first set of topics refer to nontrivial examples of adiabatic or weakly non-adiabatic behavior of quantum system: Berry phases, Landau-Zener tunneling (including Feynman path integral representation for tunneling phenomena). Secondly, we will study non-adiabatic phenomena due to interaction between quantum particle and surrounding media, including: orthogonality catastrophe, density matrix formalism and decoherence. Third part of the course is devoted to the theory of dissipation in Quantum Mechanics

Numerical Methods in Continuum Mechanics (MA060242)

Credits:6

The objective of the course is to provide students with an overview of the modern computational approaches for solving continuum mechanics problems with the emphasis on advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics methods. The course will discuss competing formulations, suitable for continuum mechanics problems, i.e. finite difference, finite element, finite volume, and spectral methods. The course will discuss a variety of topics such as the methods of solution of elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic systems of equations and application of the methods for solution of compressible and incompressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations as well as solid mechanics problems. Modern approaches for mesh generation and solution of hyperbolic conservation laws will be also discussed.

Advanced PLM techniques: Product Prototyping (MA060253)

Credits:6

Advanced PLM techniques: Testing and Models Validation (MA060254)

Credits:6

Geometric Modeling (MA060297)

Credits:6

Classification, principles and techniques of digital modelling of point sets are presented for points, curves, surfaces and solids. Specifically these include methods of modelling of point clouds, depth fields, parametric curves and surfaces, implicit surfaces and solids. Solid modelling includes such representations as Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG), Boundary Representation (BRep) with polygonal meshes and parametric surfaces, sweeping, spatial occupancy enumeration, and Function Representation (FRep).

Advanced Manufacturing of Composite Materials (MA060298)

Credits:6

This course is developed to give students a broad background and hands on experience in manufacturing of advanced composite materials. Both materials and manufacturing methods are discussed. A brief introduction to advanced composite materials and processes is presented. The course is focused on the innovative non-autoclave technologies of thermosetting resin based/fiber reinforced advanced composites. Manufacturing is covered in terms of the major steps required to fabricate laminated composite parts. These will be described and discussed in details and worked out experimentally through conducting a set of lab projects. The following technologies and methods will be covered: Vacuum Infusion, Press Molding, Pultrusion, Filament Winding, and Mechanical Testing. Typical problems of materials, tooling, cure, and technological defects will be discussed.

Heterogeneous Volume Modeling and Digital Fabrication (MA060299)

Credits:6

The course covers methods and techniques of digital modeling of volumetric point sets with attributes presenting pointwise properties such as material fractions, color, and other volumetric object properties. Modelled objects are characterized by complex volumetric geometry, multi-scale microstructures and volumetric multi-material density distribution. Stress will be made on using continuous and discrete scalar fields for modelling both geometry and attributes. Associated methods of multi-material digital fabrication will be outlined.

Quantum Computer Programming (MA060393)

Credits:6

Machine Learning in Structural Bioinformatics and Chemoinformatics (MA060471)

Credits:6

Short-term Research Project (MA0900R1)

Credits:9

Additional Thesis Research (MA0900RT)

Credits:9

Short-term Research Project (MA1200R1)

Credits:12

Industrial Project (MB0400S1)

Credits:4

Industrial Project (MB0600S1)

Credits:6

Industrial Project (MB0600S2)

Credits:6

Industrial Project (MB0800S1)

Credits:8

Industrial Project (MB0900S1)

Credits:9

Industrial Immersion (MB120005)

Credits:12

The goal of Industrial Immersion is to provide for Skoltech students real hands-on work experience in industrial sector and develop the knowledge and skills for making impact through engineering and innovation. The Industrial immersion is performed in a company and it implies that internships at academic or research institutions (like universities etc.) are excluded. Duration of Industrial Immersion is 8 weeks. Project focuses on short-term development, manufacturing or operations challenges rather than long-term research problems and is co-supervised by the company and Skoltech. The internship is cooperatively planned: project assignment is provided by the company and subject for approval of the Industrial Immersion Program Coordinator (I.I.P.C.).

Industrial Project (MB1200S1)

Credits:12

Technology Entrepreneurship: Foundation (MC030008)

Credits:3

The course target is to help you to understand technology entrepreneurship process (e.g. creation of a technology-based startup or a new business stream within an established company) from a technology-oriented background. The course is designed primarily for the students: - having intention to join a startup or initiate their own tech focused venture; - interested in "corporate innovations" in hi-tech businesses. As a framework for the course we use the “battle proven” approaches as “Disciplined Entrepreneurship” (Bill Aulet, MIT) and “Customer Development” (Steve Blank, UC Berkeley & Stanford). The course will have team- and project-based active learning formats with the combination of class lectures, “real-live” cases, in class and homework assignments (including “get out of the building and interview entrepreneur and/or customer” exercises!) as well as guest speakers’ sessions and teams’ activities and report outs. In the course you will be studying such topics as opportunity recognition and market evaluation, forming a startup team, start-up strategies, gathering resources, entrepreneurial marketing, revenue streams and pricing, as well as other you will need to know to increase your odds in putting a new technology to use and commercial success. Special emphasis is given to provide you with networking opportunities and connections within Skolkovo innovation ecosystem. The course serves as an introduction and prerequisite for the further in-depth E&I courses: Product Innovation (Term 3, new tech products & services design in cooperation with external business partners) and Technology Entrepreneurship: advanced (Term 4, deep-dive into your startup projects).

Leadership for Innovators (MC030011)

Credits:3

Successful innovators are distinguished not only by their scientific excellence as well as end user vision, but also by superior leadership skills. Scientists dream about being honored and awarded by fans on the merits of their science alone, but unfortunately it never works this way. Innovation is impossible without leading, cooperating, negotiating, and keeping resilience from the constant stress. This course presents the comprehensive skillset of leadership that includes theory and practice of: - leadership & teamwork - self-awareness and goal setting - stress management and self-presentation - empathy and 360 feedback - influence & negotiations The recurring topic of the class is that all these beneficial skills are fuzzy and overrated unless they are taken together in the globally accepted framework of "Emotional Intelligence" (EQ). The class is built as highly interactive action that starts with Q&A on a particular component of the EQ toolkit and then culminates in the intensive group and personal exercises. Considering the circumstances, we'll try to make this course as interactive as possible with your active participation in online class - sessions. Unlike your favorite hard skill classes, this course is lighter on homework, but harder on class participation. However, you will be given quite a number of home assignments, relating to self-awareness, emotional intelligence, and other leadership competences development.

Product Innovation: User-Centered & Iterative Design Process (MC030012)

Credits:3

The course is a practical introduction to the product management and product innovation process. We will deal with the challenge of delivering to market new successful tech-based products/services addressing real need and providing great customer experience. The core of the course is a structured Product Innovation Process featuring user-focused & iterative product design and combining marketing, engineering and business perspectives. The process is universally applicable to the product design in startup or established company, to the offerings targeting consumer segment or a corporate end user, to physical products or digital services. Within this hands-on immersive course, you are to run a team-based projects. In the projects you will deal with the challenge to discover customer needs, turn them into product concepts, iterate and validate your designs through prototyping and user tests. This will enable you to put into practice the course tools and techniques as well as to create your own “product innovation” professional portfolio. The projects will be done in collaboration with real startups/ventures facing the challenges of a new product design. (If you have your own idea/startup you would like to run as the course project, please contact instructor). The course prepares you to the career of Product Manager in tech company/startup. For this, we will balance key methodologies for the user-centered product design (e.g. Customer Development & Lean Startup, Design Thinking, Business Model Innovation) with the "deep dive" into prospective technologies and markets in the areas of Digital, Internet of Things, New Materials & Manufacturing, etc.

Biomedical Innovation and Entrepreneurship (MC030013)

Credits:3

The course aims to provide students with an understanding of applications and practices of biomedical science in an industrial healthcare. To put it simple, we will discuss where and how Skoltech biomedical graduates may employ their skills beyond academy science. To achieve this goal the course will decompose the industry into the value chain of independent but interconnected entities and then make deep investigation of motives, profits, and costs of any segment/entity of this value chain. The incomplete list of such entities will include: R&D-driven startups, CROs, CMOs, regulators, integrated pharmas, marketing agents, distributors, retail, hospitals, doctors. The emphasis will be made on the value chain groups that are immersed into the challendge of transforming high technologies into the tangible patient benefit, from hardcore drug development to all kinds of medical devices and services. Such challenges will be taught through development of the group project that will be developed through the stages of Problem statement (indication, regulation, POC and QC), preclinical design, clinical design, manufacturing/delivery design and final integrative presentation.

Business Communication (MC030014)

Credits:3

Business Communication is an intensive hands on, practical course, designed to provide Skoltech students with the set of skills needed to effectively communicate with others – their classmates, working teams, professors and any audiences inside and outside of Skoltech. The course learning outcomes correspond directly with the Group 3 of Skoltech learning outcomes – “Relating to Others – Communication and Collaboration”. The course will show students the secrets and technologies to becoming confident when speaking in public – developing the skills they will be able to use throughout their career and their life. In a highly interactive, informative and supportive manner through in-class activities, games and simulations the course will enable students to: Speak with confidence and overcome their nervousness; Establish rapport with any audience; Present their message in a clear, concise, and engaging manner; Successfully manage impression they make onto audience; Create—and repurpose—presentations quickly and efficiently; Make successful and memorable pitch; Sharpen the story they want to tell; Use confidently body language and movement, strengthening their speech; Respond to questions and comments without getting flustered; Gain people’s attention, respect, and cooperation.

Technology Entrepreneurship: Advanced (MC030015)

Credits:3

The course expands “Technology Entrepreneurship: Foundation” class towards the topics related to primary market research and customer discovery, product prototyping and testing with users, innovations marketing, business modeling, etc. It is designed to help students to master practical application of entrepreneurship frameworks and transfer their own early stage projects/ideas (= guesses & hopes for new tech biz) into viable biz concepts, validated prototypes/products, and, finally, fundable companies. This is an active learning course. It deals with the first-hand experience of all the pressure and demands of the real world in an early stage technological startup. Students will work as a team and deal with market/technology uncertainty. They will get out of the classroom to learn from the marketplace and to check if anyone other than the idea authors would want/use their product. And, finally, based on market feedback students will rapidly iterate their products into something customers would really use and buy. As a framework for the course we use the “battle proven” approaches as “Disciplined Entrepreneurship” (Bill Aulet, MIT) and “Customer Development” (Steve Blank, UC Berkeley & Stanford). Course benefits: • Learn the advanced and practical skills in the area of Technology Entrepreneurship & Innovations • Develop Lean Startup mindset/skillsets and build competence in customer, business model and agile development • Connect to top-notch mentors, investors and fellow entrepreneurs and get coaching opportunities • Create your “entrepreneurship portfolio” and propel your projects up to viable products, biz concepts, funding opportunities, etc.

Technological Innovations: from Research Results to a Commercial Product (MC030016)

Credits:3

The course is about managing applied Research and Development, critical analysis of new emerging technologies, transferring research results and discoveries into successful products. Research and development process in a company or in a technical university is usually application and product oriented. There are usually no universal rules on how to distinguish a commercially perspective research result / technology from many others; neither there are standard paths for commercializing scientific results. Intuition and skills come with practice. So, in this course, practical skills and experience will be developed. Students will go through multiple real cases of successful commercialization of research results in various technological fields - materials science, nanotechnology, photonics, space, chemistry, data science, energy etc. They will see and practice in how a research result from a laboratory can be transferred into a product, find its customer and market and, finally, become commercially successful. Opposite situations (that are, in fact, more common) will be studied equally carefully: when originally promising technologies did not make its way into a product - due to multiple reasons that will be analyzed. The lecturers will be balanced with practical work. The real-life conditions will be modelled as much as possible – aimed to develop hands-on skills and experience in critical evaluation of new technologies, comparing them to existing alternative solutions, finding a proper product realization and a market niche. Students are expected to go through technological innovation process themselves and then to compare, when possible, their results to the real stories of successes and failures. Students will apply their learnings to their current research – considering their own results and/or results of their colleagues and collaborators from the point of view of commercialization potential, finding right target market, realizing a competitive product.

Technology Planning and Roadmapping: Foundation (MC030017)

Credits:3

Technology Planning and Roadmapping (TPR) is a key corporate function that companies put in place to understand, manage, and define technology strategy. The main goals of TPR are: 1) to provide understanding on current technology investments in the company (portfolio management); 2) to identify technology investment options for future products and services (landscaping); 3) to benchmark the company’s technology strategy against market competition and accounting for global technology trends (benchmarking); 4) to valuate future financial benefits, risks, and technical feasibility of envisioned technology investments (valuating); 5) to prioritize technology investments by analyzing potential future scenarios while accounting for corporate strategic drivers (prioritizing); and ultimately 6) to formulate recommendations for research and development (R&D) investments based on the definition of a rigorous technology strategy (planning). Technology Planning and Roadmapping: Foundations (TPR:F) covers the theoretical fundamentals of technology planning and roadmapping, including fundamental concepts, an overview of the most common tools and processes used by practitioners in the field, and application examples from companies in different sectors. In short, TPR:F is about building the intellectual foundations that will allow students to collaboratively build a TPR system for an industrial organization. The main deliverable of TPR:F is the development of a technology roadmap for a student startup or reverse-engineering of the roadmap of a company of interest to the student.

Technology Planning and Roadmapping: Advanced (MC030018)

Credits:3

• Technology Planning and Roadmapping: Advanced (TPR:A): this course represents the practical application of the tools taught in TPR:F. It provides students the opportunity to practice hands on the real issues that arise in implementing a TPR system in industrial organizations, and to develop an actual technology roadmap in class team-work. The best technology roadmaps coming from different class editions may be published online or in international peer-reviewed venues, with students as lead authors (Scopus-indexed conferences or journals). TPR:A is about using the TPR system to explore a cutting-edge technology area of choice of the class, among those aligned with major trends occurring worldwide across different technology sectors of relevance to Skoltech (Biomed, Energy, IT, and Space). The main deliverable of TPR:A is a group-based technology roadmap report. Students will develop in teams a sector-wide technology roadmap, to be later presented as a report.

Developing Products and Services through Design Thinking (MC030022)

Credits:3

Startup Workshop (MC030025)

Credits:3

Startup Workshop (SUW) is the 3-credit E&I course designed to accelerate the Skoltech student/faculty/researcher teams developed and inspired by the Innovation Workshop and similar project-based E&I courses (IW, SFW, or TEF), though any Skoltech team is welcome to join through the mechanism of competitive selection. SUW course is extremely practical and pragmatic as its whole and only point is the preparation of the project application for the startup financing coming from two core Russian entrepreneurial infrustructural organizations: Skolkovo Foundation (SkF) and FASIE. Despite such formal learning objective may look too narrow and mundane, it allows distinguishing the SUW course in two unique ways: --- 1) building the SkF application that is well-grounded and properly structured, is an intensive exercise requiring major learning/experimenting/prototyping. The team that passed the SUW will be ready to face each and every venture investor of the world; --- 2) as SUW teams enter the formal path of Skolkovo startup, they will obtain an intensive help from the Skoltech Dept of Business Devt, that will provide not only mentoring, but also some minor competitive financing. SUW pushes teams through the preparation of the SkF/FASIE application that consists of 6 building blocks: 1) problem validation, 2) product/technology description and validation, 3) competitive analysis and market assessment, 4) commercialization plan, 5) team and roles, 6) integrative 3-yr plan. SUW is quite intensive: it starts well before the Term 2 with the competitive selection and requires serious work each week to produce the graded presentation.

Technological Innovations: from Research Results to a Commercial Product (MC030028)

Credits:3

Entrepreneurial Finance (MC030028)

Credits:3

Technology Entrepreneurship: Seminar (MC030029)

Credits:3

The course is designed to help you to master practical skills of technology entrepreneurship and to accelerate your startup projects up to “external support/funding ready” level. It is intended for students: (1) interested in new tech venture creation and technology entrepreneurship; (2) having their own projects/ideas in development; (3) planning startup contest participation, pitch to investors, applying to Skolkovo Foundation, “Bortnik Fund”, STRIP, accelerator/incubator program, etc. The startup project concept may be in the experimental mode, or further along in its evolution such as seeking customers or pilot tests. The course will be conducted as practical and hands-on lab. We will not study entrepreneurship as a theoretical subject through external cases or papers. The material for learning comes directly from the class projects and the issues faced by students in converting their projects into successful ventures. This assures projects accelerated development and creates a highly dynamic environment for teaching where the faculty is a facilitator, mentor, tracker, and lecturer at the same time. Within the course project teams are expected to develop and deliver various presentations on selected aspects of their business idea. Each class member is expected to contribute actively to the discussions and presentation critiques. The course subject areas represent “golden standard” for tech startups: (1) Problem and Market Need; (2) Product and Technology; (3) Market evaluation; (4) Business Model; (5) Startup Team; (6) R&D/Marketing/Sales/Funding plan; (7) Storytelling and Pitching. Upon the course completion, you and your team will • propel your project to the next level of its development; • get well-structured project description (Executive Summary + Slides Deck + Project Pitch) ready for Russian and international startup events and support programs; • learn the advanced and practical skills of Technology Entrepreneurship & Innovations.

Entrepreneurship & Innovation Project (MC0300I1)

Credits:3

Entrepreneurial Marketing and Commercialization (MC030445)

Credits:3

Innovation Workshop (MC060001)

Credits:6

The Innovation Workshop (IW) is a one-month full-time “boot camp” MS-level course that unites the entire Skoltech incoming class with faculty and esteemed invited mentors to create the foundational experience in Entrepreneurship and Innovation (E&I) for all. IW is designed to instill a positive “can-do” teamwork attitude in the Skoltech culture, as well as to cultivate the art of prototyping quickly, under pressure, with help from others, and based on whatever resources are at hand here and now. . Experiential inquiry-based learning leads IW student through the entire technology innovation cycle along the three pillars of innovation: (i) Impact (Problem + Feedback), (ii) Novelty of the solution (IP + Prototype + Science), and (iii) Vision for the subsequent iterations (Next Steps + Picture of Success). This work is performed in cross-disciplinary teams operating under time pressure thus creating real life experience of complex innovation project. . This file is the abbreviated version of the IW syllabus that carries only the most technical summary information. Please find the full IW Syllabus in the Files section of your IW Canvas page, as well as the attachement to this submission (the clickable "Upload" URL in the bottom of this document). Students of the IW are strongly recommended to read the full Syllabus as it carries plenty of information necessary to succeed in the IW and in innovation in general. .

Ideas to Impact (MC060002)

Credits:6

Technological innovation is critical to the survival and competitiveness of emerging and existing organizations. This course lays the foundation to undertake a robust analysis and design of opportunities for technology-based commercialization. We introduce tools and frameworks that help isolate and control the factors shaping the identification, evaluation and development of commercial opportunities. Throughout the course we use technology examples originating from problem sets found in engineering and scientific education to develop the skills necessary to connect technology and impact. At the same time, through creativity lab students will be introduced to a variety of creative problem solving techniques and learn how to apply these techniques in the context of the development, evaluation and application of ideas and concepts with commercial potential; consider the evaluation of business ideas that translate existing business models into new national contexts. The course is designed to help students develop the ability to find, evaluate, and develop technological ideas into commercially viable product and process concepts, and build those concepts into viable business propositions. The material covered is research and theory-based but the course is practice-oriented with much of the term spent on shaping technology-based opportunities. A central objective of this subject is to equip students with an understanding of the main issues involved in the commercialization of technological advances at both strategic and operational levels.

Intellectual Property and Technological Innovation (MC060006)

Credits:6

Intellectual property (IP) is a critically important aspect of technological innovation and a key factor in the management of technology-intensive enterprises. Basic knowledge of intellectual property principles and practices is increasingly important for university researchers, and expertise in the management of intellectual property is a key skill set of technology leaders in both established corporations and entrepreneurial ventures. Intellectual property affects not only technology commercialization strategy but also the direction of scientific research itself. University research groups increasingly compete with each other for scientific reputation and access to resources on the basis of their ability to obtain patent protection for the practical applications of their research; but also on the basis of their ability to plot research pathways to maneuver around the "proprietary territory" of other research groups. Skill in using IP data bases, and associated analytical tools, can empower university scientific teams to craft more powerful research strategies. This course will survey basic concepts of intellectual property and provide an introduction to a variety of types of intellectual property and IP-related rights, such as patents, copyright, trade secrets, trademarks, design rights, database rights, domain names, and demarcations of origin. The classroom sessions will include lively discussions of case studies of the management of IP and the resolution of IP-related problems in the process of technology commercialization. Each student will conduct an analysis of intellectual property issues related to his or her own Ph.D. research topic. Use will be made of special IP data and IP analytics tools.

Technology Entrepreneurship: Foundation (MC060008)

Credits:6

Thinking Disruptive for a Big Future (MC060010)

Credits:6

The goal is to open the mind of the audience showing that there is not only one predetermined path for a career after the studies, that the world is big, fantastic and that the problems we face are huge, but fascinating. The goal is also to show that there is no, or should not be any Chinese Wall between mathematicians, physicists and engineers. Finally, the goal is to show how some ideas, some of them being very theoretical and some others not, can bring to the creation of startups. It will rely on the more than 30 years of experience of Jean-Francois Geneste who will exemplify with encountered concrete examples he met along his career. We shall go through "the law of the mean", disruptive systems (airships, pseudo-satellites, launchers, mining in space, fractionation and responsive space), disruptive equipment (infinite impulse propulsion, CVC jet engine, thermal solar arrays), systems intrinsically resistant to terrorist attacks, Disruptive science... The students should understand also that the current fashion of thinking that breakthrough innovation is dedicated to the yougsters is not true. Of course, it will be proved that breakthrough innovation can occur, as used to say Einstein, can occur when many enough of the supporters of the former order are dead, but it also requires deep knowledge, which, to some extent, is only possible from a certain age. Because there are 2 kinds of disruptive innovations. And this is one of the interests of this course to explain what the two kinds are so that the students know and can make a choice if they really decide to be involved in disruptive innovation.

Hack Lab: Laboratory for Ideas (MC060024)

Credits:6

IoT: Launching New Products & Startups (MC060026)

Credits:6

Intellectual Property, Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship (MC060027)

Credits:6

Entrepreneurship & Innovation Project (MC0600I1)

Credits:6

Thesis Research Project (MD030002)

Credits:3

Thesis Proposal (MD030023a)

Credits:3

Thesis Status Review (MD030023b)

Credits:3

Thesis Pre-Defense (MD030023c)

Credits:3

Thesis Defense (MD090003)

Credits:9

English for MS Thesis (ME030034)

Credits:3

The Course offers concise and practical guidelines for writing and defending a Master Thesis at Skoltech. The course focuses on the specifics of the main parts of the paper in terms of structure, vocabulary and grammar, and their transformations for a presentation with slides. The course is designed to develop a conscious approach to own writing through thorough analyses of the best authentic examples combined with intensive writing and editing practice. The ‘process-for-product’ approach teaches the students to write - use (peer) reviewer’s advice – revise/edit – repeat and creates linguistic awareness needed to avoid the typical pitfalls.

Additional Thesis Research (ME030040)

Credits:3

Short-Term Project (ME030041)

Credits:3

Additional Thesis Research (ME060040)

Credits:6

Short-Term Project (ME060041)

Credits:6

Practicum in Experimental Physics 2 (ME060208)

Credits:6

Additional Thesis Research (ME090040)

Credits:9

Short-Term Project (ME090041)

Credits:9

Additional Thesis Research (ME120040)

Credits:12

English Toolkit (MF030001)

Credits:3

The goal of the English Toolkit course is to activate Academic English skills required for successful education at Skoltech. The students will practice Academic vocabulary and grammar, as well as boost their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills within a range of research-related topics. The course uses the communicative methodology, interactive techniques and modern technological tools, and is based on the principle of 'learning by doing'. The chosen format provides the students with a flexible and individualized learning trajectory. Real-time feedback for online exercises is complimented by tutor feedback for the writing and speaking assignments for a better understanding of the main language difficulties, providing an opportunity to improve and see progress. By the end of the course, the students will - have revised the key grammar points and vocabulary units essential for academic communication; - know, be able to identify and use the structure of a sentence, paragraph, a typical essay, and research paper; - be able to write and self-edit coherent, clear and correct texts; - collaborate with peers on a project to produce a language toolkit and a portfolio of materials related to further stages of academic writing.

English Toolkit (MF030001)

Credits:3

The goal of the English Toolkit course is to activate Academic English skills required for successful education at Skoltech. The students will practice Academic vocabulary and grammar, as well as boost their reading, writing and speaking skills. The blended format includes a weekly online workload plus an offline group tutorial providing a flexible and individualised learning trajectory. Real-time feedback in online exercises will be complimented by tutor feedback for the writing and speaking assignments.

Academic Writing Essentials (MF030002)

Credits:3

Academic writing skills are necessary for effective research, innovation, and educational activities in a multinational setting. The aim of the course is to provide guidelines and strategies for writing academic texts, focusing on relevant aspects of grammar, vocabulary, and style. The course includes analysis and practice of various forms of scientific and technical writing, and builds writing skills from sentences to paragraph structure, from summary to abstract, and lays the foundations for writing scientific papers and Master Thesis. Modern science is, for most purposes, a collective collaborative effort, so the course is designed to promote individual and group responsibility by providing mutually related and time-dependent tasks, such as peer review. The course is writing-intensive with ample opportunity to practice editing and peer-reviewing.

Master Your Thesis in English 1 (Multidisciplinary) (MF030003)

Credits:3

The Course offers concise and practical guidelines for writing and defending a Master Thesis at Skoltech. The course focuses on the main parts of the Thesis in terms of structure, vocabulary and grammar, and their transformations for a presentation with slides. Students will develop a conscious approach to own writing and presentations through thorough analyses of the best authentic examples combined with intensive writing and editing practice. The ‘process-for-product’ approach teaches the students to write - use (peer) reviewer’s advice – revise/edit – repeat and develop linguistic awareness needed to avoid the typical pitfalls in writing and live presentation. The Course is offered in two modules which gradually build on the necessary writing and presentation skills.

Master Your English for Thesis (MF030003l)

Credits:3

Master Your Thesis in English 2 (Multidisciplinary) (MF030004)

Credits:3

Master Your Thesis in English (MF060003)

Credits:6

Master Your Thesis in English 2 (MF060004)

Credits:6

Crystallographic Methods (TA020279)

Credits:2

Physical Chemistry Analysis in Solid-state Physics (TA020281)

Credits:2

Image Processing (TA030006)

Credits:3

Non-linear Optimization Methods (TA030251)

Credits:3

Modern Algorithmic Optimization (TA030252)

Credits:3

Modeling of Mineral Reactions in Deforming Rocks (TA030274)

Credits:3

Introduction to Modern Quantum Calculations of Molecules and Crystalls (TA030278)

Credits:3

Tomography and Squeezed States in Quantum Optics and Quantum Mechanics (TA030282)

Credits:3

Simulation and Optimization Methods (TA030292)

Credits:3

Electromagnetic Compatibility Theory and Radio Frequency Distribution (TA030300)

Credits:3

Time Series Analysis (TA030338)

Credits:3

Quantum Electrodynamics (TA030398)

Credits:3

Solid-state Chemistry (TA050280)

Credits:5

Mathematics of Science (TA050306)

Credits:5

Modern Methods of Data Analysis: Stochastic Calculus (TA060109)

Credits:6

Electron Microscopy (TA060110)

Credits:6

Communication Theory (TE050297)

Credits:5